Ashes


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I have a bunch of ashes in my burn pit from cleaning up after Michael. Is it ok to throw this on my compost pile? It's all from the limbs and leaves and such. The or beds cleaned out, so this would obviously be the easy way to go.
 
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Ash raises ph and has potassium. Is that good for your soil needs? Personally I would sufficate the fire after it is hot and get as much charcoal out of it as possible because unlike compost charcoal will not disappear over time in the soil and holds the hell out of oxygen and other good stuff.
 

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Sprinkle some on the compost, but not around roots or too close to plants should be OK. Good for encouraging flowering. Not too much. Best apply in Spring time, around March for fruits or any time before flowering. Nice source of potassium!
 
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nice circle to burn things there. we just have a heap out at back of all the twigs /branches/ limbs etc. every now and then we light it up. I usually pull the hose down near just in case. but its never gotten out of hand.
 
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It is problematic if you have too much clay content. Otherwise, good advice above.
 
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It is problematic if you have too much clay content. Otherwise, good advice above.
Well, there is this thing that happens when the fine clay strips hydrogen out of water and increases acidity via increased hydrogen which is measured by the pH or power of Hydrogen... That alkalinity of ash adds some fine surface layer of resistance and some small amount of K and perhaps some other minerals not burned away.
 
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Well, there is this thing that happens when the fine clay strips hydrogen out of water and increases acidity via increased hydrogen which is measured by the pH or power of Hydrogen... That alkalinity of ash adds some fine surface layer of resistance and some small amount of K and perhaps some other minerals not burned away.
Could you elaborate?
 
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In time, excessive rainfall leaches the soil profile's basic elements (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium) that prevent soil acidity. Organic matter decay produces hydrogen ions (H+). Like that from rainfall, acidic soil development from decaying organic matter is insignificant in the short term but adds up over time. Rain itself can be somewhat acidic. Clay soil, being so fine, has a lot of surface area. The surface area has exchange sites that can "hang on" to H as well.
 
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I spread mine about the garden all the time But I keep it away from plants that like a low ph. I have a lot of Buxus that like a bit plus My Hydrangeas, forsythia, lilac, weigela & even the lawn can benefit.
 
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In time, excessive rainfall leaches the soil profile's basic elements (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium) that prevent soil acidity. Organic matter decay produces hydrogen ions (H+). Like that from rainfall, acidic soil development from decaying organic matter is insignificant in the short term but adds up over time. Rain itself can be somewhat acidic. Clay soil, being so fine, has a lot of surface area. The surface area has exchange sites that can "hang on" to H as well.
Thanks, I needed that. How about discussing (Tiger) pelleted agricultural sulfur and the highest rates you can apply on a continuing basis, assuming a starting point of >7.0 and sandy loam with (now) buried crushed limestone which was a decorative mulch on foundation landscape beds, now home to assorted azalea, box, periwinkle, Hosta, et al. I distribute chopped oak/beech leaves into the periwinkle each autumn now, and originally mulched with ~12" (total) wood chips in the 1st 3 years over a base of ~12" (commercial) compost/topsoil mix.
 
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Thanks, I needed that. How about discussing (Tiger) pelleted agricultural sulfur and the highest rates you can apply on a continuing basis, assuming a starting point of >7.0 and sandy loam with (now) buried crushed limestone which was a decorative mulch on foundation landscape beds, now home to assorted azalea, box, periwinkle, Hosta, et al. I distribute chopped oak/beech leaves into the periwinkle each autumn now, and originally mulched with ~12" (total) wood chips in the 1st 3 years over a base of ~12" (commercial) compost/topsoil mix.
That is a busy patch! So for loam I see 4 lbs of sulphur per thousand square feet but for sand 2 lbs to drop from 7 down to as low as 6.5pH. So maybe start with 3 and roll into it? It takes a really long time for sulphur to break down and change things so don't get ahead of the process or you may overshoot.
 
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To me, the P is incidental, it's the C with unlimited available reaction sites that is what I'm after. It IS nice to not buy bone meal anymore, ~always overpriced. I will attach a string of .pdf files that I have assembled to tell the story. Back around the turn of the century I had to buy the dust that they swept-up off the floor in charcoal mills. It cost more to ship than the value of the product and had no P content to speak of. Now I can buy Bone Char used to make sugar white and many other industrial ways and is available at some elevators, ~$25/40 lb bag. I use about one bag per year.

This all started for me somewhere around 2000 when I watched a NPR show about Francisco de Orellana, and the origin of El Dorado. Some time later, I ran across an anthropology article about South American Amerindians and Terra Preta de Indio, and had an epiphany. Over time I collected Links to like articles, some of which Links now abandoned, so I captured what I could and made them into .pdf's so I could still pass this background on to people interested in soil science (at a gardener's level). Sooner, or later this will become real science and change the way we farm for the better. Anything that changes slash-and-burn to slash-and-char will be welcome by everyone.
 

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Now I can buy Bone Char used to make sugar white and many other industrial ways and is available at some elevators, ~$25/40 lb bag. I use about one bag per year.
Please explain. industrial ways? what is sugar white or is that the bleaching result?
 
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Please explain. industrial ways? what is sugar white or is that the bleaching result?
Sugar comes from beets and cane. Cane sugar needs to be processed with Bone Char to make it white. Otherwise, charcoal is a filtering medium.
 

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