what do you think about Cuscuta (dodder)?


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I've only ever seen one of these fascinating plants. I know we have at least one species here in North America, and that they're a pest, since dodder is parasitic. I certainly don't want to find any of this in my garden, but I think they are very cool. I think it's an obligate parasite, and doesn't photosynthesis at all, unlike mistletoe. I would guess that controlling this plant in your personal garden is fairly easy, but I really don't have any experience. Do you have any in your garden?

Changing topics slightly, mistletoe has some cultural significance in the west. We hang it in doorways during Christmas and tradition says if you meet somebody underneath it you're supposed to kiss. (Everybody just uses it as an excuse to kiss their sweetheart.) Also, some mistletoe species have been identified as keystone species: they have a disproportionately large role in their environment, and many other species rely on their presence to survive. Do you know if any species of dodder is similarly important culturally or ecologically?
 
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This problem, of course. Dodder is, in my garden, but very little. When I do the weeding, I try to note it on the crop plants in a timely manner, and to have time to destroy. In the fall you must dig deep ground. Then the seeds can not germinate. If dodder does not receive the control and limitation, all plants should be discarded.

When my children were small, I had brought a small dodder stems without roots and put it next to another plant in a pot. Dodder start quickly grab it and it made a big impression on children. Just so that they understand that it is dangerous and difficult to kill.

Agriculture uses prophylaxis against dodder. For example, analysis seed or alteration of crop rotation.

Gangster plant, unambiguously.

 
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I've only ever seen one of these fascinating plants. I know we have at least one species here in North America, and that they're a pest, since dodder is parasitic. I certainly don't want to find any of this in my garden, but I think they are very cool. I think it's an obligate parasite, and doesn't photosynthesis at all, unlike mistletoe. I would guess that controlling this plant in your personal garden is fairly easy, but I really don't have any experience. Do you have any in your garden?

Changing topics slightly, mistletoe has some cultural significance in the west. We hang it in doorways during Christmas and tradition says if you meet somebody underneath it you're supposed to kiss. (Everybody just uses it as an excuse to kiss their sweetheart.) Also, some mistletoe species have been identified as keystone species: they have a disproportionately large role in their environment, and many other species rely on their presence to survive. Do you know if any species of dodder is similarly important culturally or ecologically?
Thank you for share, I have see only those green and yellow vines in my place.

Some believe extract from it is good for bone, used for massage.

I found that it can transmit virus from one plant to other (max. 20 cm from host). Young seedling grow on soil, if within 1 week it does not find host plant after germination, it dies.

Even if you remove the visible parts from host it regrows again from parts inside vascular bundles of host.

Cause of death of host plant may be infection from fungi, virus or bacteria entering at the point of attachment., Sometimes host die when the witch hair cover the host, lack of sunlight eventually kill it.

There are few confusing questions like witch hair/dodder feed on host sap. So, does it acquire the properties(chemical) of host plant?

If in future, I get one, I think it will be best to quarantine the host plant away from others.
 
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There are few confusing questions like witch hair/dodder feed on host sap. So, does it acquire the properties(chemical) of host plant?

That's a fascinating question! I wonder if it could attach to milkweed or dogbane and take up cardenolides as a defense. That might be important agriculturally.
I love that it's called witch hair. That's just such a fun name.

Even if you remove the visible parts from host it regrows again from parts inside vascular bundles of host.

Ah. That would make it difficult to control. You would have to do some judicious pruning, or discard your entire plant.
 
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This problem, of course. Dodder is, in my garden, but very little. When I do the weeding, I try to note it on the crop plants in a timely manner, and to have time to destroy. In the fall you must dig deep ground. Then the seeds can not germinate. If dodder does not receive the control and limitation, all plants should be discarded.

When my children were small, I had brought a small dodder stems without roots and put it next to another plant in a pot. Dodder start quickly grab it and it made a big impression on children. Just so that they understand that it is dangerous and difficult to kill.

Agriculture uses prophylaxis against dodder. For example, analysis seed or alteration of crop rotation.

Gangster plant, unambiguously.

Nice video, thank you for sharing, tomato plant has evolved with hairy thorn on stem against dodder attack, their germination is trigger by seed germination of host plant.
 

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