Wasted food produce in the UK


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Beth, we enjoy doing the demo programs, held at a local church who loans us the use of their kitchen and meeting room. They even have a few ladies who pitch in and help with the set-up. We set the limit at 20 people, and have lately been having 12-15 people come for the demo. The heartening part of it is the new attendees say that they heard about it from a friend/neighbor, and wanted to come. It's a lot of fun for us, all of us. Sometimes we even sing while cooking!
I don't think Texas has the $ for $ program, but I will look into it and see if it's available. What a great idea!
Without the federally subsidized food program, and the federally subsidized crop support programs, a lot more people would be going hungry--seriously hungry! We grow our own vegetables and have a small orchard going, but anything that isn't canned, frozen, or eaten (often on the way to the house after harvesting:rolleyes:) we give to the local food pantry. So many of the elderly, handicapped, or those simply overcome by circumstances appreciate fresh vegetables.
 
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Beth, we enjoy doing the demo programs, held at a local church who loans us the use of their kitchen and meeting room. They even have a few ladies who pitch in and help with the set-up. We set the limit at 20 people, and have lately been having 12-15 people come for the demo. The heartening part of it is the new attendees say that they heard about it from a friend/neighbor, and wanted to come. It's a lot of fun for us, all of us. Sometimes we even sing while cooking!
I don't think Texas has the $ for $ program, but I will look into it and see if it's available. What a great idea!
Without the federally subsidized food program, and the federally subsidized crop support programs, a lot more people would be going hungry--seriously hungry! We grow our own vegetables and have a small orchard going, but anything that isn't canned, frozen, or eaten (often on the way to the house after harvesting:rolleyes:) we give to the local food pantry. So many of the elderly, handicapped, or those simply overcome by circumstances appreciate fresh vegetables.

Yeah I know, those programs can be a double-edged sword, but it's great that you're doing what you do. Although I am not aware of anyone going hungry here, unless it's kids of drug-using parents who sell their Bridge Card bennies or homeless people with absolutely no resources. And I know plenty of poor people for real, plus I volunteer with a Catholic Charities homeless shelter/resource organization. All the poor people I know - granted mostly older folks, not families with kids - routinely have a surplus of food, plus their Bridge card benefits, commodities deliveries and meals on wheels, and spare food is typically given away, traded for money, fed to feral cats, or just thrown out.

I have done a search and can't find anything like the Detroit program, or what you are doing, around here. I'm just north of Murderville USA, aka Flint Mich, and there are scores of black churches here. I know the pastors at a couple of them and I'm going to ask if there are similar programs here, and if not, why not?

And also: I know two people personally and others tangentially, who live at the very bottom edge of Social Security - which means monthly benefits of like $392 per month. Total. To live on. Yet also get $190-odd in food benefits, plus Meals on Wheels (daily deliveries of two meals per day Monday through Friday), plus generous monthly deliveries of canned and dried food, government cheese and milk...they don't need food, they need money for utilities and to pay their water bills and if they have a pet, to pay for pet food and care. So they sell their food benefits that they do not need for basic living expenses because who the heck can live on $392 per month? I am approved to legally buy groceries for a neighbor on her card and I do but mostly what she needs is money to pay Consumers (gas and electric bill) and other basic expenses. doG strike me down, but I sometimes use her card to buy food, then pay her cash so she can pay other essential bills.
 
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I can top all of your stories! When I was in my early 20's (long ago) I was living on Social Security and got food stamps, which aren't enough to live on in Michigan.

My mother and her parents had taught me some homesteading skills, so I decided to plant a garden so I could have something more to eat during the spring and summer. After reading online about intensive cultivation, spending about $300 in food stamps and social security on tools, fertilizer, and vegetable seeds, and hand-cultivating a hundred square foot patch down to an 18-inch till, I finally planted my vegetable garden.

This garden had everything - corn, spinach, basil, carrots, eggplant, bok choy, two rows of cayenne peppers, dill, lettuce, beans, zucchini, and of course the rows were marked by radishes.

I had about $5 left, and my neighbor was an older lady who was an impoverished government employee by day and a church-going old maid by night, so I decided to surprise her by planting some phlox and zinnias by her basement apartment window to cheer her up. She saw me and asked what I was doing and I explained.

She had never seen a cultivating fork before! She was really scared, and asked where I got it, and didn't believe me until I showed her my hoe and spade. She asked me why I had them and I showed her my veggie patch.

No good deed goes unpunished.

The next night she went to a week-long "social workers' convention". A couple of nights later, at midnight by my analog cell phone's clock, I heard a lot of noise outside and went to the window. The Federal Bureau of Investigation was in my vegetable garden with a forensic vacuum, sucking up $200 worth of seed and fertilizer and about three weeks' worth of grueling physical labor. The next morning they knocked on my door bright and early and asked to see my seed packets.

It was like they had never heard of vegetables. Or eaten anything but fast food. Or cooked for themselves. They had no idea what cornbread was. Fortunately, I had some cornbread mix so I was able to explain by whipping up a batch for breakfast. They asked what kimchi was, what pesto was, why I had planted so many kinds of radishes (literally only three or four), and demanded to know why I ate so much salad and so many vegetable crudites.

Even US government employees are ignorant where it comes to cooking and nutrition.
 
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What an nightmarishly, outrageous occurrence! I'm so sorry that happened to you. Were you ever compensated for your loss? I'm guessing not.
 
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No, I was never compensated for my time or the financial damages.

Then again, they've sent a lot of social workers after me over the years, and those social workers have wound up in the French Foreign Legion, or as mercenaries in the Japanese army, or the British army, or ANZAC, or the Angolan army (a pet project of mine since Angola is a fledgling Communist government in northern Africa where there are too few Communists), because apparently they give away the answers to the ethics test in social worker school when the students have no ethics of their own. Frequently, these higher-functioning college-educated white collar workers have turned out to be unable to read and write at third-grade level well enough to keep a journal with a ballpoint pen and a wide-ruled composition book. The ready revenue from their contracts has saved me a lot of expense because I was able to meet otherwise ruinous lawsuits with even more ruinous countersuits and build a lot of wealth in the government contracting sector all over the world in the process.

My children are all privately educated at very, very good boarding schools, and they eat well (including lots of veggies), and they're mostly headed for careers as NYPD officers who will never, ever be bribed. I've been able to start a few organizations devoted to literacy, homesteading skills, and geopolitical awareness. And if America gets invaded, the standing military is just the beginning of how we'll play hell with the invaders.

And to think, when I was a kid, I just wanted to be a carpenter.
 
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maybe we should ponder that if the educational system incorporated . "Food Skills" at an early age in school , like began at age 5 years old then waste would not be an issues. People would know what to do with food, even if they did not grow it. How to can, how to preserve, how to cook keeping nutrients. Lets face it, We usually eat 3 meals a day, what education is there to understand what that means. Also no education to strengthen the immune system. Lets face it lots of parents have no clue. I had to deal with this absence in my job daily. Taking care of the body properly means feeding it well.
 
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My Grandma taught me to bake bread and can pickles, and kept me entertained by having me slice vegetables for the salad when we visited. Those were happy times and I had no idea I was learning anything. Later, when money was scarce, baking my own bread kept me alive.
 
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I can top all of your stories! When I was in my early 20's (long ago) I was living on Social Security and got food stamps, which aren't enough to live on in Michigan.

My mother and her parents had taught me some homesteading skills, so I decided to plant a garden so I could have something more to eat during the spring and summer. After reading online about intensive cultivation, spending about $300 in food stamps and social security on tools, fertilizer, and vegetable seeds, and hand-cultivating a hundred square foot patch down to an 18-inch till, I finally planted my vegetable garden.

This garden had everything - corn, spinach, basil, carrots, eggplant, bok choy, two rows of cayenne peppers, dill, lettuce, beans, zucchini, and of course the rows were marked by radishes.

I had about $5 left, and my neighbor was an older lady who was an impoverished government employee by day and a church-going old maid by night, so I decided to surprise her by planting some phlox and zinnias by her basement apartment window to cheer her up. She saw me and asked what I was doing and I explained.

She had never seen a cultivating fork before! She was really scared, and asked where I got it, and didn't believe me until I showed her my hoe and spade. She asked me why I had them and I showed her my veggie patch.

No good deed goes unpunished.

The next night she went to a week-long "social workers' convention". A couple of nights later, at midnight by my analog cell phone's clock, I heard a lot of noise outside and went to the window. The Federal Bureau of Investigation was in my vegetable garden with a forensic vacuum, sucking up $200 worth of seed and fertilizer and about three weeks' worth of grueling physical labor. The next morning they knocked on my door bright and early and asked to see my seed packets.

It was like they had never heard of vegetables. Or eaten anything but fast food. Or cooked for themselves. They had no idea what cornbread was. Fortunately, I had some cornbread mix so I was able to explain by whipping up a batch for breakfast. They asked what kimchi was, what pesto was, why I had planted so many kinds of radishes (literally only three or four), and demanded to know why I ate so much salad and so many vegetable crudites.

Even US government employees are ignorant where it comes to cooking and nutrition.
I just read that. is that for real? Would want to know how your garden was discovered. who told them. Why you were singled out a one person? Why was it so important that they send out folks to a backyard garden grower. something is a miss. We have lots of back yard gardens here, they grow lots of stuff, no one cares.
 
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My money would be on my paranoid neighbor. She grew up in a very bad neighborhood, so for her to think that anybody who had a garden was growing drugs would not be unexpected.

Compared to some other stuff that's happened to me, this story is actually kind of humorous.
 
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No, I was never compensated for my time or the financial damages.

Then again, they've sent a lot of social workers after me over the years, and those social workers have wound up in the French Foreign Legion, or as mercenaries in the Japanese army, or the British army, or ANZAC, or the Angolan army (a pet project of mine since Angola is a fledgling Communist government in northern Africa where there are too few Communists), because apparently they give away the answers to the ethics test in social worker school when the students have no ethics of their own. Frequently, these higher-functioning college-educated white collar workers have turned out to be unable to read and write at third-grade level well enough to keep a journal with a ballpoint pen and a wide-ruled composition book. The ready revenue from their contracts has saved me a lot of expense because I was able to meet otherwise ruinous lawsuits with even more ruinous countersuits and build a lot of wealth in the government contracting sector all over the world in the process.

My children are all privately educated at very, very good boarding schools, and they eat well (including lots of veggies), and they're mostly headed for careers as NYPD officers who will never, ever be bribed. I've been able to start a few organizations devoted to literacy, homesteading skills, and geopolitical awareness. And if America gets invaded, the standing military is just the beginning of how we'll play hell with the invaders.

And to think, when I was a kid, I just wanted to be a carpenter.
just read this also. SMH, interesting. stilling here in wonderment.
 
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Yep, that's true. I find it ridiculous how many people who strictly adhere to 'use by' dates - as if the food turns to poison on the stroke of midnight :rolleyes:
You have met my stepdaughter !
Seriously, things to grow and ways to preserve them would make an interesting read. We make jams and preserves, and whenever the missus picks french beans she always gets enough to freeze one lot and eat another, but I wonder if it might run out of steam quite quickly.
 
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You can also buy seeds with food stamps all over the US, and that was how my mom and I ate after I moved in with her. As for paying rent and utilities, that's why so many poor people join gangs. When I was eleven I joined Ninzaibatsu precisely because my father and stepmother refused to feed me, and I needed food and clothes. Of course, they just stole the checks and bought restaurant food (and beer) with them, but eventually the local sheriff, who was tracking "my" expenditures noticed what was happening and, rather than prosecuting them for fraud, gave them plenty of notice of what was happening so they could move to Oklahoma, where the Tulsa County Sheriff's Department gave me a hundred dollars to start a gang because I seemed too harmless because I was starving, so I started a branch of Ninzaibatsu, and the Sheriff noticed what was happening, so we moved to Austin...
 

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