Using vegetable water for plants


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I water my houseplants with the water left over from cooking vegetables. They really seem to perk up, especially when I make corn on the cob. Does anyone else ever do this? Are there vegetables that may harm the plants if I do this?
 
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We do it as well when we blanch okra or boil eggs. I haven't noticed any particular difference, but it's nice to know about the corn.
 
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We do it as well when we blanch okra or boil eggs. I haven't noticed any particular difference, but it's nice to know about the corn.

I thought maybe it was because of the sugar??? in the water, I don't know. I am glad to see someone else does this, I thought I was a little crazy. I know some add egg shells to the soil for their plants, but I never tried the water.
 
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I have used the water from soaking beans or chickpeas all night. I've never done it with water from cooking vegetables because I thought the salt from cooking would damage the plants, but I don't know.
 
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One of the downfalls of boiling vegetables for eating is that many of the nutrients end up in the water. While some would break down because of the heat, most of the materials the plants like will survive the process. Boiled spinach water would, for example, have a little extra iron. Peppers would offer sulphur compounds. While I do not know what the corn is offering, I doubt it is the sugar because plants don't usually take up larger molecules like that especially through their roots.

I don't think anything you cook will harm the plants as long as it isn't too concentrated. I think if you reduced the volume of the water too much, it could provide a fertilizer "burn" and kill your plants. Otherwise this seems to be an excellent way to conserve water and provide a little boost for your plants. Boiled water, after it has cooled, often contains a little less chlorine if you have chlorinated water.
 
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I have used the water from soaking beans or chickpeas all night. I've never done it with water from cooking vegetables because I thought the salt from cooking would damage the plants, but I don't know.

My family is watching their sodium intake, so there's no salt in the water that I use for the garden, but I don't know whether that's more beneficial.
 
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Boiled water, after it has cooled, often contains a little less chlorine if you have chlorinated water.

For this reason, I have read it is best to use rainwater. I just worry about this because of all the crap in the air. I know when you have fish, you let the water sit and the chlorine evaporate. I seem not to think of this before I water my house plants.
 

Pat

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I have used the grey water from cooking to water the plants, I can't say I saw an improvement in the plants, I used it to avoid the wasting of water, rather throwing the water down the drain, water the plants.
 
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I only use tap and rain water to water my plants. I never thought to use vegetable water. Does this make the soil smell bad after a while? It just got me to thinking because the smell of cooking vegetables is not always a great smell.
 
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I only use tap and rain water to water my plants. I never thought to use vegetable water. Does this make the soil smell bad after a while? It just got me to thinking because the smell of cooking vegetables is not always a great smell.
it does make the soil smell bad, yes ! The day of and the day after you water your houseplants with vegetable water you are left with a little funky vegetable smell in your house where the plant is sitting! vegetable water without salt is great for plants but maybe only do this when you are not expecting visitors for the next few days.
 
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Meadowlark

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It is very easy to run your own experiment...just grow one with veggie water and one without and compare.

I've done rain water experiments and without question it is far superior to well/city water.
 

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