Tomato plant dying


mturner777

Marc @ Jacksonville Beach FL
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Here's the post that someone deleted for some reason. I moved the plant. I put the pot inside another pot and plugged some of the holes so it would hold water better. I trimmed most of the dead stuff and spread the vines along a fence for support. It's in very direct sunlight and we are watering it a few times a day. At least once. I have not put anything else on it (yet), but I am looking into the suggestions you all have made and appreciate the help.

I also uploaded the exact plant description as per the "what ever you call it" tab thingy that sticks in the dirt. You might find that interesting or funny.
 

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We bought it at a local nursery in April of this year and it was about 1 ft. tall
So you've had it five months, how many tomatoes have you had from it?
Have you been pruning off the dead leaves as they have aged, or are those that we see the build-up from the last few months?
What variety of tomato is it?
To be honest, the reason I asked how long you've had the plant, is because looking at it makes me think it has just come to a natural end for the year, and if it has, you're not going to get any more.
If it's a determinate variety, that is almost certainly the case.
 
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mturner777

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I am not sure how much fruit it has yielded, but I can get that answer tonight. the full desc. is in the new pics. I think your post must have come in just after I posted that, so check out the new situation. :) Thanks
 

mturner777

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I just figured out what you guys were saying about the pics not being full size, I will make sure they are next time i upload.
 
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Maybe it's just me, I would call it quits on that mater. I've got one that's hanging on just because I'm too lazy to throw it out, but it quit producing months ago. You have time for a new one. I know all the stores here are still selling tomato starts. Some pretty big. I'd go that route.
 

mturner777

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I just got stood up on my first date in 4 years. The old me would have got drunk and God only knows what else would have happened. Instead I drank 2 beers while I waited and then came home. Now I can water the plant first thing in the morning. I am not giving up. :):):)
 
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I think it is early tomato blight my self.

Preventing Early and Late Blights
  • Inspect transplants and purchase healthy plants. Select wilt and nematode resistant varieties. Look for the capital letters V, F, and N following the cultivar name.

  • Choose a range of varieties that mature at different times. The earlier the tomato variety matures, the more susceptible it is to early blight.

  • Practice crop rotation by planting tomatoes and related vegetables in a different spot in the garden every year. Do not plant tomatoes and potatoes next to each other since they both are susceptible to early and late blight.

  • Allow adequate spacing between plants.

  • Water only at the base of the plant and early in the day. Long periods of moisture on foliage encourage blight.

  • Use a tomato staking system and remove suckers to increase air movement through the plant and to reduce moisture on the foliage. Staking also improves fruit quality and helps prevent root rot.

  • Mulch to keep plants evenly moist and to reduce watering, weeding, cultivation and blossom end rot.

  • Remove the bottom branches of the tomato plant, especially if they come in contact with the soil. Cut the bottom branches with a pair of scissors or garden shears. Trim the branches right at the plant stem, but do not cut into the stem.

  • Monitor the leaves, especially lower ones, for the first symptoms of tomato early blight and Septoria leaf spot. Remove infected leaves and begin application of a labeled fungicide. Tomato late blight can strike suddenly, often attacking the upper stems and foliage first, and then rapidly cause fruit infection. New, more aggressive fungus strains now exist, so early warning and prevention is critical. It is essential that vegetable gardeners monitor information from cooperative extension offices to know if late blight has been found in their region on either tomato or potato.

  • Remove all plant debris from the garden in the fall. Many tomato blight organisms overwinter on dried plant tissues.
If you discover blights in your vegetable garden (whether it’s found on tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, or other plants) ALWAYS remove the infected plant and dispose of it. You can either burn the plant, or place it in a garbage bag and throw it in the trash.

NEVER place plants that are infected with blight in a compost pile.

This is a very important step in preventing the blight from spreading to other plants in the garden.

Also, make sure to thoroughly wash your hands after touching blight-infected plants. You could accidentally spread the disease to other plants if the blight spores are on your hands.

Treating Early and Late Blights
You have done everything you possibly can to try and prevent blight from forming on your tomatoes. You go out to the garden and Drat! It has begun to form regardless of your measures. Now what? Here are some ways to treat tomato blights:

  • Use a copper or sulphur based fungicidal spray to treat the tomato plants. Spray the leaves until they are dripping wet. It is best to use this spray when it is cloudy or first thing in the morning. Avoid using it in full sun when it’s very hot outside. You could inadvertently burn the leaves when any fungicide is applied in full sun.

  • Use a baking soda spray. These sprays are good for killing fungi such as blight and are a bit more environment-friendly.
  • Been there so the above is a result of my internet search on the subject.


  • Since I use raised beds I remove all the dirt wash the timber with a mix of water and bleach 4:1 ratio in the fall. In the spring I repete the wash once again early when day time highs hit 60F. Then a third wash about a week before I am ready to refill with new soil and plant sets.

    :D Al
 
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Says 78 days from transplant, and you've had it twice that time. It's possible to save the plant, but mature tomato plants are ugly and, even if it was to start flower production now, would you get the night temperatures to set fruit?
Even if you did, I don't think that the fruit would have time to mature before frosts.
Usually plants are transplanted with some flowers on, so, bearing in mind that you don't have summer light levels or day length, is it realistic to expect to harvest any more tomatoes, I mean, what will the weather be like in another 78 days?
Sorry friend, I wish I could give you better news, but I think you're wasting your time.
If you decide to go ahead and save it, I hope you prove me wrong.
 

mturner777

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I guess I was thinking It would keep living and then give fruit next summer if we covered it with a bag at night or something in the winter, lol. Ok, i just read up a little and see that it's looking more doomed because winter is coming. Oh well, not giving up yet though.
 
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I guess I was thinking It would keep living and then give fruit next summer if we covered it with a bag at night or something in the winter, lol. Ok, i just read up a little and see that it's looking more doomed because winter is coming. Oh well, not giving up yet though.
You could build a greenhouse around it, provide it with full spectrum led grow light energy and warmth during the off season and see what was left next year. I have a book for you to read before you do all that though..a favorite author of mine by the name of Pollan..the first book I read was called "The Botany of Desire". It may help you get back in phase with your plants. "Phase" is also a currently hip word to bandy about when talking football so it may serve you in multiple ways. It is also a concept word expressed physically in the world of electromagnetic energy production from the power company, such as single phase coming to your home. Pollan and his concepts are refreshingly lighter than my overly dense postings.
 
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I guess I was thinking It would keep living and then give fruit next summer if we covered it with a bag at night or something in the winter, lol. Ok, i just read up a little and see that it's looking more doomed because winter is coming. Oh well, not giving up yet though.
Ok. You seem very attached to that plant and willing to put in the effort to keep it alive over the winter.
No promises, but here's what to do.
1) Give up any hope of more tomatoes this year.
2) Cut the plant right down to soil level, the way you would with many other perennials, cut down any growth that emerges before December.
3) Move the plant to somewhere cool but frost-free during winter, giving just a half cup of water when the pot is very dry. (A frost-free garage is good)
4) In March, when it starts to emerge, bring it into the light and topdress the pot with a handful of chicken manure pellets (NOT raw chicken manure, you'll burn the roots) and a small handful of woodash if you can get it, and resume watering like you did this year.

That's your best chance of avoiding disease over the winter.
 

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