Three Trees

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Hello,

I received some trees from a friend that came from the arbor day foundation. I misplaced the booklet that identified which trees they are looking for some help identifying them as I am having difficulty. I am located in Northeastern PA.
Thanks in advance.


1. This one grew very fast. about 4 and half feet now after a year from 10-12 inch
TSEz5Mv.jpg


2. Grew about half as fast as #1
CKzDFjb.jpg


3. Grew about the same rate as #1
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Thank you. I tried matching them on the arbor day site where you order the 10 trees before posting but I couldn't make a identification.
 

MaryMary

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Welcome to the forum!! :)


I received some trees from a friend that came from the arbor day foundation....(snip)... I am located in Northeastern PA.

I have confidence that someone here can identify these trees for you, but just to get the ball rolling... @zigs? @Larisa? @Chuck? (Maybe that will help!) :D (y)

In order to help them help you, it would be good to know your hardiness zone. You can add it to your member profile.. (Saves much time!!) If you do not know it, click the green 6 in my avatar box that says "Hardiness Zone: " It will take you to a map, and a link to your profile page where you can make changes. I also think it's helpful to at least list the state you are in in your avatar box - some insect pests only live in certain areas.

(Chuck, I am still amazed you identified that rare invasive simply by asking if the member was in FL. :notworthy::notworthy:.)


Another thing that might be helpful is if you could ask your friend which package they bought. The Arbor Day Foundation sells flowering trees, trees to feed wild birds, trees for shade, Autumn colors... any hint will help. ;)
 

MaryMary

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@Larisa, I just meant "calling" you three to thread! You are the three that first came to mind for identifying trees. :oops: I didn't mean to imply that you (collectively) would absolutely, definitely, without a doubt know them, just that calling you all with an " @ " would get your attention. :) (And for that purpose, it did work. :D.)

And you had an idea for one, so... ;)
 

zigs

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First one looks like a Tulip tree :)
 
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The last one looks similar to the leaf of a paper mulberry. Even if it's not a paper mulberry, maybe another species of mulberry, but that's just a guess from it looking similar to mine.
 
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Thanks everyone. I found some of the paperwork. #1 is a Tulip tree and #2 I think is a Washington Hawthorne.
99% sure #3 is not from the arbor day bunch since I found a few more smaller ones growing nearby. This does look like a paper mulberry as roadrunner suggests.
 
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Thanks everyone. I found some of the paperwork. #1 is a Tulip tree and #2 I think is a Washington Hawthorne.
99% sure #3 is not from the arbor day bunch since I found a few more smaller ones growing nearby. This does look like a paper mulberry as roadrunner suggests.
I had two paper mulberry trees and chopped them down, because they are subject to insect infestation; both of my trees looked healthy, but after chopping them down, I saw large areas inside the trunk which were eaten out by something.

Secondly, to get mulberry fruits you need both the male and female tree for pollination. I only had the male trees and they were not contributing to my little habitat that I'm trying to create in my yard, they were just soaking up much needed nutrients and water for other plants. (They are native to Asia and considered an invasive plant here in Florida).

Lastly, they readily propagate through its root system and I've even seen new growth from the larger logs of the trees I chopped down. The leaves appearance can be very different, especially of the saplings and can look totally different than the adult tree. Every time I see a sapling I yank it out, because I don't want any more of those trees.

https://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/broussonetia-papyrifera/

Excerpt:

"The most revealing characteristic of paper mulberry is the highly variable leaves. In size they range from 3 to 10 inches in length, and are arranged alternately on stems. Smaller leaves tend to be simpler, ovate in shape with pointed tips and serrate margins. Larger leaves tend to be cordate (heart) or mitten shaped, some deeply lobed, with three large or sometimes two smaller lobes near the base of the leaf. Soft, pubescent hairs are found on the underside of leaves."
 

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