European Union Expands ban of Three Neonicotinoid Pesticides

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This story has been big news for gardeners for the past few years here in the States. I've heard all kinds of pros and cons of this ban, which wasn't really a ban when they first did this in 2013, but I think it's probably closer to a ban nowadays (or maybe not)...

The pros are kind of obvious, but the cons I've heard is that this ban is only a ban on the new type of Neonicotinoids, but when you ban those, then it forces people to use more deadly pesticides; at least that is what I've heard.

Is this true or am I way off base?

BTW, I don't have a dog in the fight, because I don't use any type of X-icides, including herbicides, since I just like observing nature; I don't fret if something eats my tomato plants...

I'm just really curious....


Here's the latest article: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/04/european-union-expands-ban-three-neonicotinoid-pesticides

Excerpt:

The European Union today expanded a controversial ban of neonicotinoid pesticides, based on the threat they pose to pollinators. The decision pleased environmental groups and was greeted with trepidation by farming associations, which fear economic harm.

In 2013, the European Union placed a moratorium on three kinds of neonicotinoids, forbidding their use in flowering crops that appeal to honey bees and other pollinating insects. The pesticides are commonly coated onto seeds to protect them from soil pests; when the seed germinates, the pesticide is absorbed and spreads through the tissue. It eventually reaches pollen and nectar, which is how pollinators are exposed. Many studies have shown harm to pollinators in laboratory settings; large field trials have produced mixed results.

The European Commission last year proposed extending the ban of three neonicotinoids—clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam—to all field crops, because of growing evidence that the pesticides can harm domesticated honey bees and also wild pollinators. A scientific review by the European Food Safety Authority, released this February, added momentum to the campaign.
 
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I am not so quick to jump on the ban pesticides bandwagon. When you consider that 1,000,000 children die each year from malaria it seems that a little more study should be done. After Rachael Carson’s book Silent Spring came out almost every country did the knee jerk reaction and totally banned DDT. With the proper application of DDT malaria could be nearly wiped out. Unfortunately, it is cheaper for politicians to just ban a substance then to fund an in depth study to see if lesser levels or modified chemicals could minimize the side affects. This leaves more money for politicians to buy votes with. After all, the million black babies that die every year in Africa can’t vote so why should politicians be concerned?
 
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I am not so quick to jump on the ban pesticides bandwagon. When you consider that 1,000,000 children die each year from malaria it seems that a little more study should be done. After Rachael Carson’s book Silent Spring came out almost every country did the knee jerk reaction and totally banned DDT. With the proper application of DDT malaria could be nearly wiped out. Unfortunately, it is cheaper for politicians to just ban a substance then to fund an in depth study to see if lesser levels or modified chemicals could minimize the side affects. This leaves more money for politicians to buy votes with. After all, the million black babies that die every year in Africa can’t vote so why should politicians be concerned?
As far as politicians are concerned there is a cure for malaria mosquitoes and has been known for years. Why they haven't done anything is a mystery. The cure is called Bacillus Israelensis a cousin of Bt. It's the active ingredient that is in Mosquito Dunks. It would be fairly simple to air deliver this bacteria all over Africa and anywhere else the malarial mosquitoes are found or any other mosquito.
 
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The EU has banned most pesticides (this includes all type of 'cides) for domestic use and are now working their way through the professional use. Some of them certainly need banning but others I'm not so sure.

We haven't used any in our garden for over 40 years but we don't need to grow the volume, or make a living out of it, as farmers do.

It's a difficult balance to maintain between convenience and necessity. I'm against indiscriminate use and careless use. An example of careless use is when the farmer, whose field backs onto our garden, sprayed chemicals in a fine spray and a high wind. The spray damaged the fruit trees that we have at the back of our garden. After taking him to court for the damage he now uses a system that uses heavy droplets of chemical and never does around the edges of his fields when it's windy. We are now friendly with each other. (y)
 

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