Lots of stones

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I got tired of looking at the border along my fence which consisted of small white rocks, lots of them. I decided to get rid of them and plant some Clusia with the intent for it to form a hedge. I’ve been at it all day and can’t get rid of all the rocks - it’s futile, there are too many. I’ve removed dozens of 5-gallon pails of them and am exhausted. I am wondering if the soil is littered with a bunch of the smaller stones will this hinder growth etc? I am in South Florida, east coast near west Palm beach.
8E443DD7-2122-4250-96CD-3E1FD1809532.jpeg
 
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I got tired of looking at the border along my fence which consisted of small white rocks, lots of them. I decided to get rid of them and plant some Clusia with the intent for it to form a hedge. I’ve been at it all day and can’t get rid of all the rocks - it’s futile, there are too many. I’ve removed dozens of 5-gallon pails of them and am exhausted. I am wondering if the soil is littered with a bunch of the smaller stones will this hinder growth etc? I am in South Florida, east coast near west Palm beach. View attachment 79316
Some of the best farmland I have ever seen was as or more rocky than this. Are these rocks just there or they on all of your property. If they are just in that particular location it is probably crushed limestone gravel. If all over the property it is probably rock sediment from ancient coral. Either way, it probably has a high content of calcium which can tie up other nutrients that plants need and the remedy for this is to use copious amounts of epsom salts and/or rock phosphate. To make sure this is the case plant your plants and if they start to turn yellow you will know the reason. Then add the epsom salts. Rocks themselves don't make for poor soils, it is what they are made of that counts. Most rocks are full of minerals. It is only the high calcium content rocks that can be a somewhat minor problem.
 
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Thank you for the input. These rocks were added by the previous owner - ornamental type from a store that I guess he kept adding to as they lost their “whiteness”. I should have taken a picture before hand. When you say epsom salt - like what you soak in. The same? Just sprinkle on or mix with water and spray on. In general our soil here in south FL leans on the Sandy side.
 
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Thank you for the input. These rocks were added by the previous owner - ornamental type from a store that I guess he kept adding to as they lost their “whiteness”. I should have taken a picture before hand. When you say epsom salt - like what you soak in. The same? Just sprinkle on or mix with water and spray on. In general our soil here in south FL leans on the Sandy side.
You just sprinkle it on. For most plants a big handful is plenty. And yes, the same thing you soak in. It won't hurt any plant and will help most, even those without a calcium deficiency.
 
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The rocks in the planting bed will not be a problem. Pitch-apple or Autograph Tree (Clusia rosea, sometimes sold as Clusia guttifera, but this is not a valid name) should appreciate the extra drainage. Rather than removing rocks, add a generous amount of compost or organic soil amendment to the bed. After planting, add additional compost as mulch.
 

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