How to care for strawberry plants


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Hi all. I have a half a dozen strawberry plants and there are berries growing on them now. They are very small and green but they are there nonetheless. I'm curious how I should tend to the plants. When I water them, the leaves just lay there in the water. Do these creep or should I tie these off somehow? I've never tried strawberries before. I also planted blackberries and raspberries.

I also noticed little holes in the leaves so there are critters going after the plants. What can I do about them?

Thanks!

Mike
 
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I don't know much about growing strawberries but I do know a little about insects and plant pests. Pictures are essential to diagnose who or what is damaging your plants.
 
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Sorry for the lack of a photo. I took several last night on my phone and then they got lost in cyberspace when I emailed them to myself. LOL I'll try again later today when I get home.
 
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Sorry for the lack of a photo. I took several last night on my phone and then they got lost in cyberspace when I emailed them to myself. LOL I'll try again later today when I get home.
just make sure they are some close ups
 
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The convention wisdom is to plant them ~18" apart in matted rows and discard last year's mothers each spring. They are biennials, but will fool you into believing they can last longer. Don't be fooled! They will put out more daughter plants than you need. If not this year, PDQ. The matted row needs to be narrow enough for you to pick from both sides without stepping into it. Choose a space for your patch, -a row, then divide the space into your six plants and center them equally in the patch. It might look silly to you, but do it. They produce very little the first year, are plentiful the second year, and take up space from then on.

After disappointing production this year, your six plants will put out some runners. Make "U" shaped anchors out of something like copper wire. They should be 2 to 3" long; long enough to hold a runner in-place. The runners (stolons) will go out in several directions. You need to pin them to the ground spaced where you want them. After that daughter puts down roots another will spring from her, ad infinitum. By the time there are 3 or so daughters in a row, mother will have put out others. The six plants this year will have 7,493 daughter plants by September. If that's more than you wanted, too bad. If you like to plan your garden, you should make a decision on how many plants you want, the exact location where these prospective plants should be planted, guide the daughters to these locations, and stop the madness when the goal is reached. As each is firmly rooted, cut the umbilical. Mom won't take the hint. Be persistent. No plants should enter winter with stolons still attached. Lastly for the year: save your Popsicle sticks for use as markers for Mother plants. As soon as the productive season is over (in 2020), you will reach in and rip the six 2nd year plants out and throw them away. If the stolons are still connected, it's a big deal because of entanglements.

Each spring, mark each plant with Popsicle sticks which will be 2nd year, high production plants. Repeat, ad infinitum. If you didn't buy a good named variety, you will understand why that's a good idea and worth the expense.
 
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Hi all. I have a half a dozen strawberry plants and there are berries growing on them now. They are very small and green but they are there nonetheless. I'm curious how I should tend to the plants. When I water them, the leaves just lay there in the water. Do these creep or should I tie these off somehow? I've never tried strawberries before. I also planted blackberries and raspberries.

I also noticed little holes in the leaves so there are critters going after the plants. What can I do about them?

Thanks!

Mike
First u need mulching under strawberry plants. Fruit not touch the soil directly.
Second. U should planted on farrow
 
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