Has anyone ever had their gas tools repair?


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I have a gas tiller/cultivator and I'm trying to decide if I want to get it repaired or just replace it. If you have repaired any gas tool, how much did you dish out if you didn't repair it yourself?
 
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I have a gas tiller/cultivator and I'm trying to decide if I want to get it repaired or just replace it. If you have repaired any gas tool, how much did you dish out if you didn't repair it yourself?
That all depends on what it is, what's wrong with it and how severe. If the engine is beyond repair, say with a cracked block you can probably replace the engine for a lot less than a completely new machine of the same type. Or possibly you could go to a small engine repair place and obtain a good used engine for even less. Same thing with the gear box. Repair prices on small engines such as tillers, lawnmowers, chainsaws etc all depend on where you go and how greedy the mechanic is. Or you could go to Craigs List but then you aren't sure if you are not just inheriting someone else's problem and paying them for the privilege. Or you could just whip out the old checkbook and fork over $2700 for a brand new TroyBilt Horse. Hey, it's only money.
 
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You can expect to pay at least 300% more to have a repair shop fix just about anything mechanical. I've always worked on all my cars, and garden equipment, and now that we have the internet it has made it a whole lot easier for many who have never done it before to jump in and give it a try. There are how-to videos out there to show how to fix many things today. Granted, you are gonna need more than just a screwdriver, and a hammer in your toolbox, but on the same token a good set of basic tools will get most jobs done.
If you want drop the model # and what is wrong with it here, and just maybe we can get you up and running with a much smaller cost to you.
 
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I agree with what he says up there (y) Why don't you sort of describe what it is you're trying to repair or fix and I'm sure someone will figure out how to fix it, save you a little $$$. You can get parts online a lot cheaper too.
 
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You can expect to pay at least 300% more to have a repair shop fix just about anything mechanical. I've always worked on all my cars, and garden equipment, and now that we have the internet it has made it a whole lot easier for many who have never done it before to jump in and give it a try. There are how-to videos out there to show how to fix many things today. Granted, you are gonna need more than just a screwdriver, and a hammer in your toolbox, but on the same token a good set of basic tools will get most jobs done.
If you want drop the model # and what is wrong with it here, and just maybe we can get you up and running with a much smaller cost to you.


I agree with what he says up there (y) Why don't you sort of describe what it is you're trying to repair or fix and I'm sure someone will figure out how to fix it, save you a little $$$. You can get parts online a lot cheaper too.

Thanks for the advise but I would have to wait until the weather breaks before I can really find out what is going on with it. I can look online though. Just to get some ideas of might be the problem.
 
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I repair almost all my own gear, garden, car and house. I have taken my stihl chain saw in a couple of years ago, as the carb had failed badly. I looked at the $200 repair on my 25 year old saw, but also knew it would last another 25 years as it is metal not plastic and has been great up till this ethanol/gas issue caused a problem. A new one to replace it was almost $500.

I had it repaired and it did well until last summer when I tried to drop a tree and the tree dropped straight down on the saw, cracking the handle, trigger and stood there. By the time I got the truck, some rope and the wife to pull it on over - the saw was bowed. Go the tree down and although the trigger is damaged, a bit of duct tape and she is good to go. Not sure I will replace the damaged parts right now, as it works as it did - just like it is.

And MsJones, after you get it repaired.....it is cheaper to keep it in shape, than to get it in shape. Use good fuel and start it monthly and let it warm up to temp, whether you are going to use it or not.
 
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When it's convenient for you, just give a shout out, and we'll see what we can do to help.

Warmer has been forecast for the upcoming week hopefully I'll be able to check out my tiller and be able to tell you what it is not doing. We'll see...
 
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I have a gas tiller/cultivator and I'm trying to decide if I want to get it repaired or just replace it. If you have repaired any gas tool, how much did you dish out if you didn't repair it yourself?
What size and price was it?
Often it is just as much to replace as to renew, as you have to pay labour.
If you replace, you instantly have a stock of spare parts.
 
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Before anything I will check the 3 important basics, gas, spark and compression. These days it's typically the gas that causes small engines a lot of problems (besides broken pull ropes for me o_O). If it's a non specialty item like the lawn mower or generator I'll try and take things a part and see what I can do. Buy new is a last resort. Cheap Weed Wackers unfortunately are semi disposable in my estimation.

With some stuff the better the quality, the higher the price, but the better the repair opportunity i.e. a more expensive product might have a better carburetor which in turn has rebuild kits and parts readily available. Older stuff (my chain saw for example) can also be of higher quality and so I would rather have it repaired than replace it. I find the smaller stuff harder to work on too.

In the past couple years I've started adding Stabil or Seafoam type products to the gas in my gas can in an effort to prevent issue as a result of the gas now being sold.

On the other hand if you bend a valve, break a ring and score a cylinder, it would have to be a fairly high dollar item to pay to have things like that repaired.
 
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Finally, I looked over my tiller and it will not start. The primer button in shot and gas/oil mixture stared leaking from the tank. What a mess! :mad::censored:.

The make is Ryobi. I believe this is one of the better models, isn't it? I bought it used and the upper part that supplies the power can be interchanged with the weed wacker.

I appreciate all of your responses. The good thing about all this is that I didn't fork out a lot of money for it. I will probably start looking for a replacement part for the upper that supplies the power.

Thanks again.
 
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Two cycle engines rely on a closed system, that's why there are two hoses leading to the gas tank. If the primer is shot the system is no longer closed, and as a result leaks gas. HD sells a replacement primer for a few bucks, and is probably all you need. Remove the two screws that hold the bulb on. Replace with new bulb, and re-secure the two screws. Very simple fix MrsJones.
 

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