Growing herbs

Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Country
us
Hey guys I'm looking at growing herbs this year and drying them. Should I be starting from seed inside outside or buying already started plants? I'm in zone 5b. Any tips on growing them? Tia
 
A

Advertising

Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Country
us
I'd like to grow basil, thyme, cumin, cilantro, and rosemary for sure. Might try growing some others
 
A

Advertising

Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
2,523
Reaction score
3,500
Location
central Texas
Country
us
Brian, buy a start of rosemary--it's notoriously slow to germinate. Basil is easy from seed--I start ours inside, also thyme. I can't comment on cilantro (we don't like the taste) nor cumin (we don't use much).
How about Italian Flat Leaf parsley? It germinates well, grows during the cooler season, and has a wonderful flavor.
About drying herbs--basil chopped fine and with a little water added to make a "mud pie" consistency; placed on a wax-paper lined cookie sheet in tablespoon size blobs and frozen; then the frozen blobs placed in a freezer container until a blob is needed. Much better than drying. Thyme cut when the stems are 5" long or so, hung out of direct sunlight but with good air circulation, and then stored in a dark, cool spot in a glass jar, wonderful herb!
Rosemary may be evergreen in your area--it was for us in upstate NY. It is best grown in-ground and harvested when needed. If you want to dry it, the method is the same as for thyme.
After you have success with your herbs this season, consider adding marjoram and oregano to your herb garden. Both are perennial, lovely flavors, and can be grown either in containers or in-ground. We grow Mexican oregano because the Italian oregano just can't stand our heat and humidity.
When drying herbs, leave the leaves whole. The more surface area exposed, as in ground or pulverized herbs, the more the flavor loss. Rub your dried leaves between your hands just before adding them to a dish. You'll love the aroma!
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Country
us
Brian, buy a start of rosemary--it's notoriously slow to germinate. Basil is easy from seed--I start ours inside, also thyme. I can't comment on cilantro (we don't like the taste) nor cumin (we don't use much).
How about Italian Flat Leaf parsley? It germinates well, grows during the cooler season, and has a wonderful flavor.
About drying herbs--basil chopped fine and with a little water added to make a "mud pie" consistency; placed on a wax-paper lined cookie sheet in tablespoon size blobs and frozen; then the frozen blobs placed in a freezer container until a blob is needed. Much better than drying. Thyme cut when the stems are 5" long or so, hung out of direct sunlight but with good air circulation, and then stored in a dark, cool spot in a glass jar, wonderful herb!
Rosemary may be evergreen in your area--it was for us in upstate NY. It is best grown in-ground and harvested when needed. If you want to dry it, the method is the same as for thyme.
After you have success with your herbs this season, consider adding marjoram and oregano to your herb garden. Both are perennial, lovely flavors, and can be grown either in containers or in-ground. We grow Mexican oregano because the Italian oregano just can't stand our heat and humidity.
When drying herbs, leave the leaves whole. The more surface area exposed, as in ground or pulverized herbs, the more the flavor loss. Rub your dried leaves between your hands just before adding them to a dish. You'll love the aroma!
I was told on another forum I may need a greenhouse to grow rosemary and cumin as they require 4 months of at least 85 degrees?
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
2,448
Reaction score
2,393
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
us
Here is some rosemary tips for zone 5.

You might consider growing the little ones indoors for year round cooking. Maybe use a grow light?
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
12
Reaction score
3
Country
us
Thanks for the help so far guys. I ordered basil, thyme, cilantro, and dill seeds last night. Is dill easy to grow from seed? Should it be started inside or outside? Thanks
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
2,523
Reaction score
3,500
Location
central Texas
Country
us
Brian, dill is best grown when the seed is direct seeded in the ground and yes, it is easy to grow from seed. If you let a couple of dills go to seed, they will provide you with dill for the next season. We planted dill one year, and haven't had to plant it again--it is a plant that just keeps on giving!
 
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
1,475
Reaction score
1,099
Location
Oakville,Ontario
Hardiness Zone
5A
Country
ca
I'm starting rosemary right now. At the grocery store just before Christmas, they had it in pots and they were shaped like little Christmas trees and of course smelled heavenly. I want to try that too!
48264
 
A

Advertising

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top