Growing Golden Currants from Seeds - Pot Size, Space Requirements, etc


RsTgardenian

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Hi,

So I have some golden currant seeds in peat pellets right now and was wondering about what kind of pots I could use to plant them in once they've grown enough? Like how wide should the pots be? Do they need a certain depth for root development? My yard has a small garden area but I'm not planning to put them there but instead somewhere along the side beds of my house or the backyard beds if they actually grow big enough eventually. However I don't have any raised beds or plots like that for them. I'm also wondering if they can stay in pots if they're large enough even after the plants have reached maturity?

Thank You!
 
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Meadowlark

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Greetings RsTgardenian.

Have you stratified the seeds before putting them in peat pellets?

As they can grow to be up to 9 feet tall and 8-10 feet wide, it would be much better to locate them in an outside location that would allow this much room. Your chances of seeing fruit and a beautiful plant are greatly increased if they have sufficient room. They should have well-drained, preferable sandy loam w/neutral ph and either semi-shade or no shade.
 

RsTgardenian

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Greetings RsTgardenian.

Have you stratified the seeds before putting them in peat pellets?

As they can grow to be up to 9 feet tall and 8-10 feet wide, it would be much better to locate them in an outside location that would allow this much room. Your chances of seeing fruit and a beautiful plant are greatly increased if they have sufficient room. They should have well-drained, preferable sandy loam w/neutral ph and either semi-shade or no shade.
Hi Meadowlark, thanks for the reply. I didn't stratify them, I just left them in a glass container full of room temp water until for a day to scarify them. That's all the instructions mentioned on the packet they came in. I do have quite a few seeds left over that I didn't try stratifying though; do you think it would be worthwhile to try stratifying them? And how would you recommend doing that? For some black raspberry seeds I'm also trying to get started I put them on a moist paper towel in a plastic bag and then put it in a refrigerator. Would that work for these too?

And regarding space, unfortunately I don't think I have that kind of room in my yard to let them flourish (despite my yard overall being decently sized). The best I could do is probably put one or two fast growing shrubs in a sort of open spot in a woodchip bed; though I'm not sure how well they would do in soil covered by woodchips. The thing is we have a pretty large lawn but not actually a lot of space allocated for gardening (our current garden plot could maybe expand a little).

Again I appreciate the reply. Have nice day, Meadowlark!
 
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Meadowlark

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...

And regarding space, unfortunately I don't think I have that kind of room in my yard to let them flourish (despite my yard overall being decently sized). ….
I would put some of that space to productive use, LOL and reduce your mowing labor...but that's just me. ;)

Regarding stratification: Currant seed generally needs stratification and I assume the golden current does also.
Peat moss works well for stratifying seeds. Place some of the extra seeds between two layers of slightly damp peat moss and then put them into a plastic bag. Poke holes in the bag to allow air circulation during stratification. Put the bag of the currant seeds layered in peat somewhere that stays just slightly above freezing for three to four months, such as a refrigerator. Then have at it!
 

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