FRUIT TREES IN WILD WALES


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Hi folks !
I live in a very rural part of Wales, on an exposed ,isolated, mountain top.... I wish to plant eight fruit trees...
I am concerned about the strong winds here in winter time...I have been advised, by an expert, to use stakes for the saplings..
However, I am wondering if this is such a good idea ?

I refer to a well known fable ....The sturdy oak was torn down before the onslaught of the mighty winds , yet, the tiny,humble conifer that bent and yeilded before the high winds, surived and flourished..

Thinking along this principle, I am wondering if it is better, ~Not, to restrain the young fruit trees by attaching support ?

With the ,same principle in mind, I am, also concerned about using tree guards around the trunks... The problem is there are rabbits and moles where I live so the trunks will be vulnerable to attack...

Finally, another tree planting recommendation which,rather, concerns me is the use of ~ Rooting powder, placed in the hole when planting saplings .... What concerns me is that the tree's will become dependant on the nutrients from the powder, which will mean the tree's will, actually, be weakened by use of the additional, unatural nourishment ?


To illustrate ~ There is an absolutely, massive cherry tree, directly, in front of my house, which receives the ~Full force of powerful winds coming up across the open fields.... it has, quite obviously, planted, ~Itself, there, many,many years ago... with no help from man !
and it has remained strong, healthy and robust, no doubt for centuries...

With this in mind, should I plant my eight sapling trees,
without , what is , in actuality, unatural, manmade invention, and thus, inferior to what nature, if left alone, to it's own devices, can do ?
 

Becky

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Welcome to the forum! :)

Staking trees has its place - for example, letting them establish themselves while they're taking root, or if you want them growing straight for ornamental purposes. It depends on the size when you plant them. If they're small I'd leave them unstaked and allow them to establish themselves. If you do choose to stake the tree only do it long enough to allow the tree to establish deep roots (a couple of years maybe). A loose, spiral tree protector should protect the trunk without acting as a stake.

Finally, another tree planting recommendation which,rather, concerns me is the use of ~ Rooting powder, placed in the hole when planting saplings .... What concerns me is that the tree's will become dependant on the nutrients from the powder, which will mean the tree's will, actually, be weakened by use of the additional, unatural nourishment ?
We've used a rooting powder before called Root Grow. It's a fungus that establishes a root system and forms a symbiotic relationship with the plant. The powder doesn't contain fertilizer AFAIK, and it's a one off treatment that helps the plant establish itself and take up nutrients better. We've had a lot of success using it, it makes plants stronger over time not weaker.

You can read more about how it works here: http://www.rootgrow.co.uk/mycorrhizal-fungi.html
 
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We have apple, pear, and almond trees in our little orchard here in central Texas. We have strong winds, and for the first year we double staked our young trees. A sturdy stake on each side of the tree, and soft cotton rope in a figure 8 pattern between the stakes. It allows the trees some movement, but not enough to uproot or damage the tree.
We haven't had damage from moles or rabbits (we have cats, bless 'em) but grasshoppers girdled several of our first apple trees before we could get a wrap on the trunks. We used old cotton tee shirts cut into 3" strips and wrapped around the trunks of the remaining trees. Then we sprayed the branches and leaves with a garlic spray (which has to be reapplied after a rain) and saved the remaining trees. Growing fruit isn't easy!
We also used a rooting powder, not only on trees but on perennials when planting or transplanting. When we ran out of rooting powder and had to get a couple of transplants in the ground, we noticed a difference in those two and the ones that had the rooting treatment.
And welcome to the forum! I hope you will continue to post any questions you have, and let us know how things are growing for you.
 
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Winter winds are why (fruit) trees are deciduous.

Look around you at the trees in your area; do you have deciduous trees?
 
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alp

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You could do stepovers or patio fruit trees. Go for fruit trees with dwarf rootstocks such as M27! You don't really need big fruit trees. I have an apple which is 5 foot tall and it has given me 15 or more apples this year. Last year, it had one and it was the first time it had ever fruited.

Welcome to the forum, @Tree Child !
 
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