First successful bell peppers


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i'm not sure why, but i've been trying without success for years to grow these. this year i succeeded and they're delicious. yay, me! i'm wondering if it's okay to leave them on their plants until i'm going to use them; it seems to me they would keep longer that way. advice?
 
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i'm not sure why, but i've been trying without success for years to grow these. this year i succeeded and they're delicious. yay, me! i'm wondering if it's okay to leave them on their plants until i'm going to use them; it seems to me they would keep longer that way. advice?
Where do you live? Your location and temperature have a lot to do with the time you plant. Your nutrition and growing medium are also very important. Sweet peppers are fairly easy to grow if you follow basic gardening techniques. Let us know your location by upgrading your profile. Also let us know when you plant, how you plant and all other pertinent information. I am sure we can greatly help in your growing of peppers and other vegetables.
 

Meadowlark

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Agree they are delicious home grown. From the stores...not so much...but out of the garden they are great!

As mentioned, leaving them on the vine lets them mature...but I prefer the taste green over the ripe ones. Also, your plant will produce more much faster if you harvest them rather than leave them on the plant. Harvesting them seems to encourage the plant to produce more.
 
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@Chuck, i am in the hell that is texas and it has taken me many years to learn to garden here. the growing season is weird: plant by january or february; the garden will be stone dead by july. then if you want, you can plant again the end of september, but i usually don't. the garden and i both can stand to lie fallow for a few months. i'll harvest some now, then, and leave some to turn red. i have purple ones, too. i was really excited to get those.

thanks for your input, guys (and gals).
 
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@Chuck, i am in the hell that is texas and it has taken me many years to learn to garden here. the growing season is weird: plant by january or february; the garden will be stone dead by july. then if you want, you can plant again the end of september, but i usually don't. the garden and i both can stand to lie fallow for a few months. i'll harvest some now, then, and leave some to turn red. i have purple ones, too. i was really excited to get those.

thanks for your input, guys (and gals).
Where in Texas? We might be neighbors. Oh, and this year I am having a bumper crop of peppers. Tomato season wasn't all that great but it looks like melons are going to be excellent. Got a ton of green beans but the deer ate all the okra. If you plant in Jan. or Feb you must be in the Valley.
 
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Where in Texas? We might be neighbors. Oh, and this year I am having a bumper crop of peppers. Tomato season wasn't all that great but it looks like melons are going to be excellent. Got a ton of green beans but the deer ate all the okra. If you plant in Jan. or Feb you must be in the Valley.
dallas, specifically glenn heights, and i'm having a bumper crop of tomatoes, the biggest juliets i've ever grown. the peppers are nothing to sneeze at; i know there are at least eight ripe out there now, and i already ate four, and there are little ones. it takes years (if you don't have the money to just buy a ton of garden soil, which i don't) of compost and grass clippings and manure to make this "soil" into something that can nourish things. i'm from utah--you could dump the old maids out of your popcorn while walking across a field, and harvest a corn crop two months later. the soil is amazing. i've been working on this for four years now.
 
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dallas, specifically glenn heights, and i'm having a bumper crop of tomatoes, the biggest juliets i've ever grown. the peppers are nothing to sneeze at; i know there are at least eight ripe out there now, and i already ate four, and there are little ones. it takes years (if you don't have the money to just buy a ton of garden soil, which i don't) of compost and grass clippings and manure to make this "soil" into something that can nourish things. i'm from utah--you could dump the old maids out of your popcorn while walking across a field, and harvest a corn crop two months later. the soil is amazing. i've been working on this for four years now.
Dallas. So you're in that Blackland Prarie Clay soil. I grew up in that soil. My tomatoes have just about burned up. I'm on a well so my water is a tad limited and I am using it on melons and peppers. I still have a lot of canned tomatoes and sauce from last year so my dismal tomato crop isn't so painful. At least you have had plenty of rain. Here not very much
 

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