Bag Garden


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A bag garden sounds like a really interesting idea. In the past, I have used those topsy turvy planters which are like a sack to grow everything from tomatoes to strawberries. They really work, and are quite economical too. I find the idea of bag gardens intriguing and awesome. I think they would work for many people.
 
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What an interesting idea, but I don't have any experiences with growing in bag! I have read that people growing potatoes in bags and tomatoes growing upside down too!
 
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This was my second year with the 2 cu ft bags of garden soil. We did 24 different vegetables, and so far, the only disappointment was cauliflower, which made leaves but no heads. We will be expanding the experiment next year to include a few more exotic vegetables for the greenhouse and some tires for an asparagus and rhubarb bed.
 
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I have never heard of this until now! Thanks for sharing! It looks like a good way to garden if you have to move your plants for winter or if you're in a temporary location. This also seems like a good way to grow food and plants in an urban area with no available soil. Good stuff!
 
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Since we are predicting frost for Wednesday, I will be moving any bags with viable vegetables into the greenhouse. I'm hoping for a few more peppers and eggplants....
 
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I am not all that familiar with a bag garden, but just the sound of it seems like something that would be a better option for someone like me. I happen to live in a place that is just not suitable for your traditional gardening, and while I have been lucky to have good friends and neighbors when it comes to getting fresh foods, something in me still wants my own.
 
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When I first saw this done, I was not too sure, but after two seasons, I'm a believer. Each 2 cu ft bag was planted with a different vegetable, and the only thing that didn't do well was cauliflower because I direct seeded instead of starting transplants. We ended up with two quarts of blackeyed peas, 14 Kohlrabi, six pounds of beets, 8 quarts of cherry tomatoes, 6 quarts of regular tomatoes ( we ate most of them fresh of the vine), 3 pounds of okra, 2 pounds of jalapeno peppers, 8 green peppers ( they started late, too) 10 quarts of sugar peas, 9 quarts of green beans, 20 carrots, 3 stalks of brussels sprouts, 16 eggplants, a summer's worth of chard and lettuce( salads every night) enough zucchini to make my neighbors avoid me, 12 spaghetti squash, 6 acorn squash, 4 butternut squash, 1 cauliflower, 1 watermelon,and 4 pumpkins.
 

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