Alocasia Trunk Too Long?


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Hi, All, I'm new here.

I have been unable to find any info whatsoever, ANYWHERE, on this particular problem! Maybe someone can help me?
Below are some pics of Big Ed, my Alocasia 'Regal Shields'. He has a strange issue. His trunk has become so elongated over the past 2 years that he is terribly top-heavy and wants to tip over and pull his own roots out of the pot. I've had to build a makeshift scaffold to help stabilize him so he doesn't collapse sideways under his own weight (see photos).
Is there anything I can do about this? Will I have to keep him "fenced in" forever now? I can't help but think plants are smarter and more adaptable than that... Is there a way I can get his trunk to thicken, strengthen, etc.?
Based on my previous search attempts, it would appear no Alocasia has ever "gone stretchy" before, and I refuse to believe that's the case!
Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Additional side question: in the photos, there are 2 older, drooping leaves that had begun to droop and age this summer. The leaves are still healthy lush, and large, have been since the summer, but they make it impossible to get around him without gently pulling his leaves out of the way to "lift the gate". Is it alright to trim these older leaves off? As in the photo, there's a vigorously-thriving and upright crown. I hate to trim healthy foliage, and don't want to stress him out.

Please help me. Thank you!!!
 

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Big Ed looks lovely. I want to preface my response first with I have never grown this variety of house plant so take my suggestion with that in mine. Since the bottom leaves are beginning to look “tired” I’d consider sizing up to a pot one inch bigger so it can have more growing space (but not too much). Once growing season begins you could also lightly fertilize. My solution for top heavy plants has always been rocks or small to medium boulders placed on the soil surface. I fill in with smaller pebbles to create a varied textured surface. This helps hold the plant roots in the pot and can be quite decorative. Weighting the top of the pot has been very successful for my large top heavy plants. It might work for you.
 

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