Most unusual house plants

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by taskeinc, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    taskeinc, Dec 23, 2012
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  2. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    This one is pretty wild, and actually more of an outdoor plant, but can be used as an indoor plant, as long as you have plenty of light..This is called the Juncus effusus Spiralis, or a Corkscrew Rush. It is a low maintenance grass-like perennial that grows to a height of about 18 inches. Primarily for outdoor enjoyment.

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    taskeinc, Dec 23, 2012
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  3. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    And one more unusual house plant is the Polka dot Begonia.. Likes well-draining potting soil with medium light (indirect sunlight) conditions. Polka dot Begonia's prefer temperatures between 65 and 80 degrees, along with plenty of humidity. Pinching polka dot plants will produce bushier growth as well.

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    taskeinc, Dec 23, 2012
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  4. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    It's not my plant but I find it really interesting:

    [​IMG]

    It's Lithops, it looks like alive stones, it's so strange. It grows in Africa but it's possible to grow it indoors too, it just needs a lot of sun and not too much water:)
     
    claudine, Dec 23, 2012
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  5. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    Wow, the Lithops is extremely unusual. I Google'd this odd plant and found something very interesting..

    "Lithops (also known as flowering stones or living stones) are true mimicry plants (planted above the soil). Their shape, size and color causes them to resemble small stones in their natural surroundings. The plants blend in among the stones as a means of protection. Grazing animals which would otherwise eat them during periods of drought to obtain moisture usually overlook them. Even experts in the field sometimes have difficulty locating plants for study because of this unusual deceptive camouflage."

    Nature is absolutely amazing!
     
    taskeinc, Dec 24, 2012
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  6. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    Yes, sometimes it's really hard to tell whether they're stones or plants. No wonder animals are confused:p
    Here are some more pictures, it's such an interesting plant:

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
    claudine, Dec 24, 2012
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  7. taskeinc

    Lanie New Member

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    I had the polka dot begonia once upon a time. The spots look silvery in direct sun. I moved and it went into shock and never recovered. I didn't go and get a new one after, because I found some other interesting things to grow.

    I love that creepy bat thing, very dramatic and beautiful. Here's a picture of a white one:
    [​IMG]
     
    Lanie, Dec 24, 2012
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  8. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    This bat plant is so creepy:eek:
    Another extremely strange plant I've heard of is Dioscorea elephantipes. It doesn't look like something real:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    claudine, Dec 25, 2012
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  9. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    You're right Claudine, the Bat plant is a little creepy looking, actually looks a little scary, but I'd still want one. It would be like the little dog that some people have, everyone on the outside, thinks it's the ugliest dog you've ever seen in your life, but if you're the owner, you love the dog unconditionally. That's how the bat-plant would be.

    The first image of the Dioscorea elephantipes is odd looking but it's a uniquely gorgeous plant. I wonder if it's difficult to care for?
     
    taskeinc, Dec 26, 2012
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  10. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    I heard it's really difficult to care for. You don't have to worry about watering it because it doesn't need a lot of water. But it needs a sunny, warm place and it doesn't like being trimmed. It has big problems with acclimating to new places:( And it goes dormant completely random, not only during winter (this is what I read but I don't know how is it possible).
     
    claudine, Dec 26, 2012
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  11. taskeinc

    Jed New Member

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    We had a Hoya or wax plant growing for years around windows on string. It grows as a creeper and requires very very little to no water.:confused:

    Every so often it would produce these waxy star shaped flowers that would give of a strong perfume particularly at night.

    We eventually took it down as it was getting to unruly and the leaves were getting too dusty.

    I found this youtube of a time lapse for the opening of the flowers. Check it out...
     
    Jed, Dec 27, 2012
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  12. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    Wow, this is really interesting, I've never heard about this wax plant, these flowers look so strange! They look almost like they were artificial:p
     
    claudine, Dec 27, 2012
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  13. taskeinc

    Jed New Member

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    They certainly do. They have a sweet sickly fragrance that I'm not too fond of. My wife doesn't mind it at all.They seem to give it off at night.:confused:
     
    Jed, Dec 28, 2012
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  14. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    Oh, I love sweet fragrances:D . I think I'd like this plant:) . It's strange that some plants give off the scent only - or mostly - at night.
     
    claudine, Dec 28, 2012
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  15. taskeinc

    Jed New Member

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    You should give it a go.Easy to maintain trouble free indoor plant.My kind of indoor gardening. :)
    Hoya carnosa has been shown in recent studies at the University of Georgia to be an excellent remover of pollutants in the indoor environment. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoya
     
    Jed, Dec 28, 2012
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  16. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    I have a couple of Hoya's at home, you can root them in water and start others. I had one about 5 years ago that bloomed, just like the bloom in the video. When I first saw the bloom I didn't know what to think of it, thought it was some type of fungus, or some other unusual growth. When I saw the formation of the bloom - stars - and the fragrant smell, I realized it was a part of the plant. Below is an image of one of my Hoya's, this one was rooted in water and transferred to soil about 6 months ago..

    [​IMG]

    *** Jed *** if you mist your plants that will alleviate the dust problem, plants love the mist, and it keeps insects away ..Here's my favorite video about misting ..

     
    taskeinc, Dec 29, 2012
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  17. taskeinc

    Jed New Member

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    Thanks taskeinc. I can see now we should have misted much more.
    Our plant must have been 20 foot long with creepers everywhere. It started to look bedraggled and my wife felt like a change in the kitchen.
    It was cut right back and now lives out in the hot house. I'll be sure to give it a mist of seaweed spray from time to time. :)
     
    Jed, Dec 29, 2012
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  18. taskeinc

    claudine New Member

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    Taskeinc, your Hoya is so pretty, it looks very healthy and it's so big. I love when plants grow fast. I wonder if it's possible to buy Hoya here in my country. The Hoya flowers are rather pretty:

    [​IMG]
    Are they sticky? They look like they were:p
     
    claudine, Dec 29, 2012
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  19. taskeinc

    Jed New Member

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    I can't see why not. It grows very well indoors and I'm sure your homes are adequately warm enough for the plant to grow well. That video shows how to keep up the humidity and to help it cope. Ours was never very well attended to and survived to grow to 20 feet.
    The flowers, I can't recall if they were sticky to touch. They didn't leave any residue when they eventually fell off onto the floor.
    I tried googling some nurseries in Poland but didn't get far.
     
    Jed, Dec 30, 2012
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  20. taskeinc

    taskeinc New Member

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    The flowers produced by the Hoya Plant are not sticky at all, they are very unique in their appearance, as you can see from the close-up you posted.. but the tiny flowers grow in a cluster and when in full bloom it looks as if it is another plant/flower separate from the plant itself because it looks so different. That's why when I fist saw mine bloom, several years ago, I didn't know what it was at first, and that was during a time when Google was not that popular.

    That's one of the reasons I'm so fascinated with plants because if you keep some plants long enough, and give it the proper care, it will sometimes bloom out of nowhere, and it will be a bloom you never saw before.

    OK, this will blow you away .. I've read where, sometimes if you get an unusual bloom or an unusual growth from a plant it could be someone from the spirit world trying to contact you, trying to get your attention, or just saying hello ... whether that's true or not, I have no idea, but I did read about this phenomenon in one of the many metaphysical books that I've read.

    This is interesting ... 7 wonders of the plant world.
     
    taskeinc, Dec 30, 2012
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