Worm Tea and pH


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I am making worm tea with the addition of unsulfured molasses and using a bubbler. The pH is 7.65 after 20 hours of aeration. There is little foam but that does not appear to be an issue. My concern? If I add some organic pH Down (organic acid i.e. lemon juice) will that kill the micro organisms? My intuition says no, but what do expert gardeners have to say?
 
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This actually depends on your final purpose and soil. A lot of people ask similiar detailed questions, and they never talk about the plant for which their fertilizer is intended, nor the soil or substrate in which said plant resides. Or the plant. Well some do, but not many.

Yes if you add an acid, citric or otherwise, it becomes a specific weight issue between 2 liquids and said acid may be a issue given you are bubbling what is usually considered a bacterial tea formula given the carbohydrates you are feeding it. The difference between 7.65 and 7 is fairly large. It seems you have a digital pH meter. Hydro? Do you have access to a 400x microscope? You can see the bio with a scope of that power.

Which bacteria are you propagating and why? Worm compost is simply a denser and more available form of nutrients than the material from whence it came, and a tea is a growth medium like a tetri dish in a laboratory for expanding a sample of bacteria or fungus, that latter preferring more protein. Why would you prefer a concoction that is less dense? Organic fertilizers are often not as strong as folks think they are as it is, which is why I am asking.

@Chuck and some others do this often. Seriously though, I imagine they would want to know what you are trying to do with the tea.

I have only tried to use tea as a medium for antibiotic activity myself. You will not hurt anything if you kill your tea. The molassess will be good for the soil.
 
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This actually depends on your final purpose and soil. A lot of people ask similiar detailed questions, and they never talk about the plant for which their fertilizer is intended, nor the soil or substrate in which said plant resides. Or the plant. Well some do, but not many.

Yes if you add an acid, citric or otherwise, it becomes a specific weight issue between 2 liquids and said acid may be a issue given you are bubbling what is usually considered a bacterial tea formula given the carbohydrates you are feeding it. The difference between 7.65 and 7 is fairly large. It seems you have a digital pH meter. Hydro? Do you have access to a 400x microscope? You can see the bio with a scope of that power.

Which bacteria are you propagating and why? Worm compost is simply a denser and more available form of nutrients than the material from whence it came, and a tea is a growth medium like a tetri dish in a laboratory for expanding a sample of bacteria or fungus, that latter preferring more protein. Why would you prefer a concoction that is less dense? Organic fertilizers are often not as strong as folks think they are as it is, which is why I am asking.

@Chuck and some others do this often. Seriously though, I imagine they would want to know what you are trying to do with the tea.

I have only tried to use tea as a medium for antibiotic activity myself. You will not hurt anything if you kill your tea. The molassess will be good for the soil.
I don't have a good Ph meter nor a microscope but IMO adding anything but humus/ liquid humus/humate is a waste of time. Sure, citric acid will lower Ph, for a short time. Years ago I used it but haven't in a long time, but, back then there was no such thing as manufactured humus. These days I use 2 oz of liquid humus/liquid humate per a 5 gallon bucket of compost tea. I use the Medina product HuMate. Perhaps the following link can explain why I like using it.

 

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Did you keep an eye on the temperature of the water? I have never made one, but I wouldn't use lemon juice. I should think compost/worm tea is for general purpose use.
 
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@Chuck on this site powergrown.com I found a recommendation about building a fertilizer using aminos, humic and so forth. Would you cruise that site and roll back with some thoughts?
 
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@Chuck on this site powergrown.com I found a recommendation about building a fertilizer using aminos, humic and so forth. Would you cruise that site and roll back with some thoughts?
I looked at the site and IMO it is a specialized service and not for the average or even advanced gardener. In the entire site, it barely mentions humic acids. Everything I saw works around fulvic acid. IMO without humic acids, you only have 1/2 of a base for a good fertilizer. Humic acid's big drawback is that it is not water soluable in low Ph soils. Humic acids unlock nutrients and make them available for uptake. Fulvic acids carry these unlocked nutrients into the plant due to fulvic acids very small molecules. Humic acids also help increase the permeability of a plants cell wall but not nearly to the effect that fulvic acid does. I guess that's why fulvic acid sprays work well in foliar applications while humic acids don't. Humic acids work best in the soil. They increase microbial life and increase water retention. IMO one without the other is severely lacking.
I don't know enough about amino acids to have much of an opinion. I do know that amino acids are essential but how they do what they do I am clueless.
What is your objective in all of this?
 
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Thanks for looking. They have humic acid but its almost hidden. My purpose is improving my clay soil. Biochar and humates are complementary cousins for my purposes. Humic materials bring a lot to both sandy and certain clay soils such as mine that have exceptionally low organic content. Crushed humic materials are loaded with metals from previous chelation and are not soluble, and it makes sense because its powdered pre-coal for all practical purposes. Man made or solvent humates are unsaturated and ready to work in the soil if organic matter in sufficient quantity does not already exist. The dry forms of these materials mostly just cost less, but issues like solubility concern me. Humates are ligno proteins and pretty much any amino acids help my soil. I am poking around for a source for 35,000 square feet of lawn and my garden. It is an interesting site I have bought some hormones from previously.

You may enjoy this link
 
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Thanks for looking. They have humic acid but its almost hidden. My purpose is improving my clay soil. Biochar and humates are cousins. Humic materials bring a lot to both sandy and certain clay soils such as mine that have exceptionally low organic content. Crushed humic materials are loaded with metals and are not soluble, and it makes sense because its powdered pre-coal for all practical purposes. Man made or solvent humates are unsaturated and ready to work in the soil if organic matter in sufficient quantity does not already exist. The dry forms of these materials mostly just cost less, but issues like solubility concern me. Humates are ligno proteins and pretty much any amino acids help my soil. I am poking around for a source for 35,000 square feet of lawn and my garden. It is an interesting site I have bought some hormones from previously.
I don't know your soil but if you have low organic content isn't that about the same thing as soil that has had its organic content burned away by chemical fertilizers? Low organic content is still low organic content. Before I spent a lot of money on experiments I think I would try a proven method of increasing the tilth and fertility of your soil. Please examine the following link about Soil Activator and the entire link for that matter. It is used a LOT in Texas clay soils.
 

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