Worms


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Let's talk worms. I've been reading a bit and seems there are all kinds of benefits from worms in the garden and not a lot of drawbacks. So how many, and what type? I have about 80sqft raised bed with various crops, including root vegetables, will the worms disturb carrots or onion? The soil is not the greatest and suffers from compaction, although I added some perlite to help with that. But I'm rooting with the worm idea, plus it gets me fishing bait!

Have you added worms to your garden? Have you noticed any negative effects? What type and how many?
 
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Worms will not hurt anything and they will help everything. You probably have worms and don't see them. They like organic matter in the soil and they like it moist. IMO buying worms and putting them in a garden is a huge waste of money. Buying worms and going fishing is another matter altogether.
 
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Worms will not hurt anything and they will help everything. You probably have worms and don't see them. They like organic matter in the soil and they like it moist. IMO buying worms and putting them in a garden is a huge waste of money. Buying worms and going fishing is another matter altogether.
Call it a dual purpose venture! Buy some worms, keep them in the garden for long term safe keeping (and their cheaper in bulk!). Now how to get them when I'm ready to go fishing... Hmm.
 
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Call it a dual purpose venture! Buy some worms, keep them in the garden for long term safe keeping (and their cheaper in bulk!). Now how to get them when I'm ready to go fishing... Hmm.
Just how are you going to keep them in your garden? The worms in my garden are mobile. Sometimes they are there and sometimes they are not. I am clueless as to where they go or why they go but go they do.
 
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Just how are you going to keep them in your garden? The worms in my garden are mobile. Sometimes they are there and sometimes they are not. I am clueless as to where they go or why they go but go they do.
Well, not sure. There is a lot of rotten wood at the bottom 6-8" of the bed (18" deep bed). So hopefully that will keep them busy. Either way,$30 for 350 worms is a fairly cheap experiment. Might place a flat stone on the top somewhere as a surface retreat where I might be able to harvest a few from time to time.
 
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Well, not sure. There is a lot of rotten wood at the bottom 6-8" of the bed (18" deep bed). So hopefully that will keep them busy. Either way,$30 for 350 worms is a fairly cheap experiment. Might place a flat stone on the top somewhere as a surface retreat where I might be able to harvest a few from time to time.
Hmmm. $30. That is a case of beer with $10 left over. I think I would spend the $10 on growing my own worms.

 
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I have not added worms to my garden, I feed them, and they come.

This is what I have learned from reading, having a compost bin, observing my garden, watching about a thousand YouTube videos...and reading. :geek:

They will eat almost any decaying plant matter. A worm will eat about half of its body weight every day. So if you get a pound of worms, you will need to provide them with 3.5 lbs of food every week.

(I love this video. Worms eating sawdust!)



They do not like onions or oranges. (I'd extrapolate that they probably wouldn't like anything citrus.) Don't try to feed them anything spicy hot. Oh! And nothing with salt. :eek:

They are drawn to sweeter things. They especially like bananas, banana peels, watermelon rinds, and pumpkin. (I remember watching a video about a large-scale worm farm that fed them cornmeal, molasses, and... something else, I forget.) Worm farmers will tell you that a diet of sweets is not good for their overall health. But if you want to get them in your garden, there's your hook. (Pun intended.)

They do not have stomachs, they have gizzards, like birds. They need a bit of grit in their diet to help them :poop:... pass their castings. In my compost bin, I give them coffee grounds, or finely crushed eggshells. (I'm not sure - maybe the sand in your soil would be enough?)

They will need some kind of bedding. Dampened shredded paper, or wet cardboard will work. In my own compost pile, I have seen them lay eggs in the corrugations of cardboard, they use it kind of like a nursery. (As a bonus, if their feeding schedule is disrupted, they will eventually eat the paper, too!) I watched a video once where the guy put corncobs in his bin, apparently they not only love sweetcorn, but will lay their eggs along the cob.

If you are going to buy worms, I'd suggest you only put about half in the garden. Because if you want to easily harvest fishing worms, you should start a worm bin.

You can make a DIY worm bin - a lot of the videos show using two plastic totes. There's a video of one guy (I think he's Rob from Australia) - he uses an old bathtub!! There are all kinds of fancy systems with stackable trays, as the worms fill the tray with castings, you add a tray, and they will move up into the new tray, once the food is depleted in the first one. For a DIY tray system, I saw a video where they used an old dresser, and just drilled access holes in the bottom of the drawers. (About a half inch diameter.)

Before I started my compost bin, I made "worm feeding stations" in my garden. I'd use my trowel to dig a small hole between my plants, or in the rows. I'd put in a couple handfuls of shredded bills ;), then pour in my kitchen scraps, and push the soil loosely back over the hole. (I bought a $3 blender at a yard sale, and pureed my kitchen scraps, partly as a way to dampen the paper, partly because worms' mouths are very small, and I wanted them to eat the stuff quick and leave me castings in the garden.:LOL:)

People also make worm towers, where they drill holes in either a 5 gallon bucket or a wide section of PVC pipe, then dig a hole, and sink it into the garden. They just drop their kitchen scraps in there. Would be a good way to compost if you didn't want a bin or pile, (or didn't have space for one,) and seems like it would keep the worms in your garden. Could put one every 5 feet or so, and just fill them in succession, to keep the worms moving from one end to the other. ("Hey guys! Over here!!")

If you do go with the worm bin idea, then even if they do migrate out of your garden, you'll have more to add in a short period of time. That, or you'll get to do a lot of fishing!!

4. How much Black Gold (Compost) will 1,000 composting worms create for me?
Our 1,000 count of Red composting worms can create between 8 and 16 ounces of compost per day!
But wait, there’s more! These worms double in population every three months, so as your worm population grows, the amount of Black Gold that they can create will grow as well. A year from introducing your 1,000 composting worms into your bin, you should now have 16,000 composting worms, which will create 8-16 pounds of composter [sic] per day!
If you start out with 5,000 composting worms, by the end of one year you should have 80,000 composting worms outputting 40 to 80 pounds of compost per day. https://unclejimswormfarm.com/product/composting-worms/2000-red-composting-worm-mix-sale/




You would probably want to keep them somewhere that is fairly climate controlled. They don't survive temperatures outside of 40-85 degrees F. (I think that range is right. I may be off a few degrees, I'm working off memory.)

I am clueless as to where they go or why they go but go they do.


I've never noticed a disappearance of worms in my garden, but once it's planted and HOT out, I don't do a lot of digging, either. That upper range of 85 degrees makes me think - I wonder if they just go deeper once your soil gets too warm for them. Do they seem to disappear mostly while it's hot? :unsure: Have you noticed any kind of pattern? When they are there, as opposed to not?



* I am not affiliated with Uncle Jim in any way, and cannot endorse his product. I quoted that only to show that you will want to do something with your excess worms! :ROFLMAO:
 
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I like the PVC idea. I think I'll try that. A few sections of PVC, still some holes and cap the top. Should work.
 
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I have not added worms to my garden, I feed them, and they come.

This is what I have learned from reading, having a compost bin, observing my garden, watching about a thousand YouTube videos...and reading. :geek:

They will eat almost any decaying plant matter. A worm will eat about half of its body weight every day. So if you get a pound of worms, you will need to provide them with 3.5 lbs of food every week.

(I love this video. Worms eating sawdust!)



They do not like onions or oranges. (I'd extrapolate that they probably wouldn't like anything citrus.) Don't try to feed them anything spicy hot. Oh! And nothing with salt. :eek:

They are drawn to sweeter things. They especially like bananas, banana peels, watermelon rinds, and pumpkin. (I remember watching a video about a large-scale worm farm that fed them cornmeal, molasses, and... something else, I forget.) Worm farmers will tell you that a diet of sweets is not good for their overall health. But if you want to get them in your garden, there's your hook. (Pun intended.)

They do not have stomachs, they have gizzards, like birds. They need a bit of grit in their diet to help them :poop:... pass their castings. In my compost bin, I give them coffee grounds, or finely crushed eggshells. (I'm not sure - maybe the sand in your soil would be enough?)

They will need some kind of bedding. Dampened shredded paper, or wet cardboard will work. In my own compost pile, I have seen them lay eggs in the corrugations of cardboard, they use it kind of like a nursery. (As a bonus, if their feeding schedule is disrupted, they will eventually eat the paper, too!) I watched a video once where the guy put corncobs in his bin, apparently they not only love sweetcorn, but will lay their eggs along the cob.

If you are going to buy worms, I'd suggest you only put about half in the garden. Because if you want to easily harvest fishing worms, you should start a worm bin.

You can make a DIY worm bin - a lot of the videos show using two plastic totes. There's a video of one guy (I think he's Rob from Australia) - he uses an old bathtub!! There are all kinds of fancy systems with stackable trays, as the worms fill the tray with castings, you add a tray, and they will move up into the new tray, once the food is depleted in the first one. For a DIY tray system, I saw a video where they used an old dresser, and just drilled access holes in the bottom of the drawers. (About a half inch diameter.)

Before I started my compost bin, I made "worm feeding stations" in my garden. I'd use my trowel to dig a small hole between my plants, or in the rows. I'd put in a couple handfuls of shredded bills ;), then pour in my kitchen scraps, and push the soil loosely back over the hole. (I bought a $3 blender at a yard sale, and pureed my kitchen scraps, partly as a way to dampen the paper, partly because worms' mouths are very small, and I wanted them to eat the stuff quick and leave me castings in the garden.:LOL:)

People also make worm towers, where they drill holes in either a 5 gallon bucket or a wide section of PVC pipe, then dig a hole, and sink it into the garden. They just drop their kitchen scraps in there. Would be a good way to compost if you didn't want a bin or pile, (or didn't have space for one,) and seems like it would keep the worms in your garden. Could put one every 5 feet or so, and just fill them in succession, to keep the worms moving from one end to the other. ("Hey guys! Over here!!")

If you do go with the worm bin idea, then even if they do migrate out of your garden, you'll have more to add in a short period of time. That, or you'll get to do a lot of fishing!!






You would probably want to keep them somewhere that is fairly climate controlled. They don't survive temperatures outside of 40-85 degrees F. (I think that range is right. I may be off a few degrees, I'm working off memory.)




I've never noticed a disappearance of worms in my garden, but once it's planted and HOT out, I don't do a lot of digging, either. That upper range of 85 degrees makes me think - I wonder if they just go deeper once your soil gets too warm for them. Do they seem to disappear mostly while it's hot? :unsure: Have you noticed any kind of pattern? When they are there, as opposed to not?



* I am not affiliated with Uncle Jim in any way, and cannot endorse his product. I quoted that only to show that you will want to do something with your excess worms! :ROFLMAO:
I think it must be heat related because a month and a half ago I was digging and had gobs of them. I have been digging a lot in the past two weeks and they are getting scarce. The soil temps were in the 60's and now the soil temps are in the high 70's but the soil is very dry.
 
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