What did you do in your garden today?


Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
118
Reaction score
84
Country
United States
Garden is ice today. We never have continuous cold like this I hope my potatoes rows don't freeze. 18° last night, todays high 25°F.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
118
Reaction score
84
Country
United States
Nothing today, it was a golf day.

I have a black powder cannon that shoots golf balls, they are gone never to be seen again when shot into the sky like military artillery. LOL. We shot a golf ball at a cement wall the ball splattered. Shot a golf ball all the way throw a barn.
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,225
Reaction score
1,448
Location
California
Country
United States
I admired, photographed and smelled the first Snowdrop this morning. It's the common hybrid, Galanthus x 'Magnet.

In recent years, my Winter seems to play out as a long, slowly merging Spring. This year particularly, a number of plants are blooming early: Pyrus kawakamii, Felicia echinata, Rosa banksiae 'Lutea', etc. The usual winter Salvia and such are blooming well too.

The first Snowdrop was not the first bulb this Winter. The week before, Winter-aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) bloomed, as did one clump of Muscari and a few pink Hyacinthus orientalis. A week before that a single specimen of Crocus sieberi ssp. sublimis 'Tricolor' also flowered.

The first Pokers (Kniphofia rooperi and Kniphofia sarmentosa) are also starting, with their cousins the Aloe, Bubine, and Bulbinella lining up behind.

Back in December both the commonplace Paper-white (Narcissus papyraceus) and the stunningly exotic Teal Cape-hyacinth
(Lachenalia viridflora) both bloomed, but that is actually quite typical for them.

However, what was especially odd is that a clump of Summer Snowflakes (Leucojum aestivum 'Gravetye's Giant') began blooming in November and is only now going out if bloom!
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
748
Reaction score
587
Country
United Kingdom
I have a lot of clear corrugated plastic that I saved from the roof of the aviary when our owl died last year, and I have been spreading that over parts that I dug over and mulched last week in the hopes of raising soil temp. a little before planting next month. Then I thought 'What if it gets windy?' and went round putting a brick on each corner.
Then I put up a washing line at the back of the garden, much more sun in winter. We have a tumble drier, but the last time it was used was to set the waterproofing on a rain jacket, it eats energy and simply pumps it out of a pipe at the back. Bad for our bills, bad for the planet.
It was very cold, I couldn't deal with knots and the line with gloves on and had to come in a couple of times to warm my hands.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2018
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
3,019
Location
The Tropic of Trafford
Hardiness Zone
Keir Hardy
Country
United Kingdom
Cleared the last of the leaves from the front garden.
As you can see, the area under the azaleas is always a pain to clear of leaves when they fall, from the tree, the rhodos, viburnums and the azaleas.

P1050080.JPG


To make it easier I keep this "gangway" clear between them and the party fence between our garden and that of the adjoining semi. (I took the photos earier in the year). So I can blow them towards the fence and then drag them down towards the house. Avoids a "hands and knees," job.

I'm still pleased with this fence I errected over 20 years ago. Just painted 3" square posts set in postmix, with three strands of thick garden wire, supporting a roll of mesh fencing. It's still as good as new. It's less "in your face" than the usual concrete post and waneylap panels of all the other fences in our our road.

P1050555.JPG
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 23, 2022
Messages
10
Reaction score
8
Location
Southern California
Country
United States
Today Planted 6) 6ft tall Ficus bushes, moved boards to rear of backyard to start building compost boxes tomorrow morning.
yesterday planted 2) berrie bush's, 2) grape vines, 1) assorted (grafted) apple tree, 1) peach tree, 1) plumcot.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
118
Reaction score
84
Country
United States
It has been 13° to 18° every morning for 3 weeks. I raked up more pine needles from under the pine trees to cover up the 5th potato row. The whole garden soil is frozen 2" deep hard as cement but not the 4 rows covered with pine needles. Pine needles appear to allow good air flow so water evaporates away and no water to freeze the soil. Water freezes to ice and soil hills do not freeze with no water.
100_3541.JPG
100_3542.JPG
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2018
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
3,019
Location
The Tropic of Trafford
Hardiness Zone
Keir Hardy
Country
United Kingdom
I got into the back garden today and cleared all the dead azalea, rhodo and camelias leaves, these won't completely rot down. but I do blow the last few to the back of the border. I filled the green bin.
The lawn, to use a technical term, is looking "dog rough," but will respond to a bit of attention when it gets warmer.

P1050690.JPG
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2018
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
3,019
Location
The Tropic of Trafford
Hardiness Zone
Keir Hardy
Country
United Kingdom
I'm up to date now.
The front garden is clear of dead leaves, leaving the way for the few dozen clumps of bluebells which will soon be apperaring.

The lawn just needs a bit of warm weather, though I might add a bit more seed later.

The viburnum, rhodo and azaleas are very tall now and screen the house from the road, but I have to be very careful when taking my car out of the drive as it's impossible to see traffic coming up the road from the right.

P1050695.JPG


I've cleared the area under the azaleas to the side of the patio. A bit of a pain to get at through the wire fence that stops cats pouncing on the birds on the patio. The wire's an unattractive but necessary addition, but gets screened by the azaleas as they grow through the year.

The York stone flags need a dose of, "wet 'n forget," but it's too cold at the moment, it needs to be above 5c.

P1050696.JPG


I've pruned back the jasmine on the back of this fence and cleared all its dead foliage in the bed, that's given the cyclamen a bit more light.

P1050697.JPG



We've still got a bit of colour with these primroses on the patio steps.

I've had re-use my homemade bird feeder that the woodpigeons can't get at. They re-appeared when I removed it a month or so ago and used an open plant saucer on the steps. They make far too much mess.

P1050698.JPG



Hard to see, but the snowdrops I removed from under the azaleas in the front garden and replanted here on the top of the rockery in the back garden, are just making an appearance.

P1050694.JPG
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,225
Reaction score
1,448
Location
California
Country
United States
Today my companions were my secateurs and the pole pruner. The major task was thinning the branches on my grove of Xylosma congesta. Removing dead wood and water sprouts in Winter allows more light to the shade garden plants beneath.

After that, I clipped back old inflorescences and various tufts of monocot foliage. The autumnal charms they possessed in late 2021 have deserted them with the New Year, as an early California Spring once again looms on the horizon.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
748
Reaction score
587
Country
United Kingdom
Planted out a raspberry sucker I put in a pot last year. Should have done it before the frosts, but no great harm if it didn't make it, there will be more suckers on other plants. The pots with cuttings and such in (mostly lavender and box) are the last place I have left without the leaves cleared, they get caught between the pots and help stop the roots freezing, but I always lose a few. I always take more than I need, someone will always be grateful for them.
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,225
Reaction score
1,448
Location
California
Country
United States
Today, I watered some pots and wished it would rain...

I planted a small New Zealand Tea-tree (Leptospermum scoparium 'Ruby Glow'). The deep red, double blooms and fine, dark foliage have a brooding intensity, so different from the preconceived notions of a spring flower.

A few more Spring bulbs have emerged. The first deep blue and white gold of Iris reticulata 'Pixie', and also an odd little, yellow onion relative (Allioideae, Amaryllidaceae) from Uruguay and northern Argentina: Nothoscordum felipponei. It has hopped around taxonomically, formerly being named Ipheion sellowianum or Tristagma sellowianum. At first glance, one might take it for a Romulea.

Addendum: Colchicum soboliferum is blooming too. Small pale lavender flowers at ground level. Perhaps not the most visually stunning bulb, but rich with botanical interest. It's native to the Balkans, Anatolia, Caucasia, and the like.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
748
Reaction score
587
Country
United Kingdom
Strange, I looked up colchicum soboliferum for a look, I do like those small flowers that draw you in as opposed to the big showy stand back to look at it ones. All the references I saw though called it Autumn flowering, which I would expect from a colchicum. Is yours out of rhythm Marck?
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,225
Reaction score
1,448
Location
California
Country
United States
Strange, I looked up colchicum soboliferum for a look, I do like those small flowers that draw you in as opposed to the big showy stand back to look at it ones. All the references I saw though called it Autumn flowering, which I would expect from a colchicum. Is yours out of rhythm Marck?
The genus Colchicum is often referred to as the Autumn-crocuses,* as many of the better-known species do bloom in the Fall.
However, Colchicum soboliferum is a Winter- or Spring-blooming species. It too has had a series of name changes. You might find more information about it as either Merendera sobolifera or Bulbocodium soboliferum.

* An unfortunate name in itself, as there are also many true Crocus that flower in Autumn.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
5,649
Reaction score
4,507
Location
Birmingham, AL USA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
The genus Colchicum is often referred to as the Autumn-crocuses,* as many of the better known species do bloom in the Fall.
However, Colchicum soboliferum is a Winter or Spring blooming species. It too has had a series of name changes. You might find more information about it as either Merendera sobolifera or Bulbocodium soboliferum.

* An unfortunate name in itself, as there are also many true Crocus that flower in Autumn.
I only read your post. What usda zones?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,225
Reaction score
1,448
Location
California
Country
United States
I only read your post. What usda zones?
Most Colchicum are quite cold-hardy, some to USDA Zone 4 or lower.
However, Summer heat, rainfall, and humidity should also be considered when attempting to grow them.
Many Mediterranean, Alpine, and desertic geophytes are susceptible to rot if conditions are too wet during dormancy.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2018
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
3,019
Location
The Tropic of Trafford
Hardiness Zone
Keir Hardy
Country
United Kingdom
Just checked the trail camera.
It's pointing at 'arry's 'ouse. I put some food on his patio, in case he comes out for a snack as they do sometimes in the winter. It was a mixture of hedgehog food and suet pellets.

Problem is that other garden dwellers like the suet pellets. So in the last 24 hours the camera took 112 photos and videos, like these.

IMAG0011.JPG


IMAG0105.JPG




I'm going to re-set the clock for just the hours of darkness and just put out hedgehog food.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2018
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
3,019
Location
The Tropic of Trafford
Hardiness Zone
Keir Hardy
Country
United Kingdom
I did a bit this afternoon.
Mowed the lawn and got the garden vac out to clear a few dead leaves and twigs off it which have fallen from next door's trees.
I then gave the few places where there's moss on the lawn a dose of iron sulphate. It's looking a bit rough at the moment particularly under the acer palmatum where grass always struggles to recover until July.

P1050712.JPG


Cleaned out the two birdbaths and the fountain.

P1050713.JPG


These temporary measures I've taken to stop the cat from getting into 'arry's garden, are obviously not working and look a bit of a mess, but you can't see it from the house.

P1050714.JPG



I've ordered another roll of wire fencing to see if I can make it even more difficult for cats to get into 'arry's garden.

I also ordered a couple of Chinese witch hazels.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top