Tree wood chips


Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
26
Reaction score
36
Location
Spokane WA
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
Hi,
This last summer I cut down a pine tree and was wanting to know if I can use the wood chips in my raised garden bed.
Thanks
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,362
Reaction score
3,583
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Yes you can, although pine is not the best mulch available.
 
Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
26
Reaction score
36
Location
Spokane WA
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
Thanks, if I do use it I will add a little at a time and use it with other mulch like leaves from my maple tree.
 
Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
26
Reaction score
36
Location
Spokane WA
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
Great info on the website. Well rethink the use of the pine mulch, because it did have a sour smell.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,362
Reaction score
3,583
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Great info on the website. Well rethink the use of the pine mulch, because it did have a sour smell.
The sour smell is probably because the tree was alive when chipped or at least not dried out
 
Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
26
Reaction score
36
Location
Spokane WA
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
The tree was alive when taken down. This is going to be my first attempt to plant a small garden this summer. I will have lots of questions and will use this forum to help guide me through it.
See you in the spring.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,362
Reaction score
3,583
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
The tree was alive when taken down. This is going to be my first attempt to plant a small garden this summer. I will have lots of questions and will use this forum to help guide me through it.
See you in the spring.
Pile all those chips into a big pile and pour a sugary substance like stale beer or soft drinks or molasses over them once or twice a month. This will help decompose them and make them more beneficial for your next years garden
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,443
Reaction score
1,443
Location
Mid Michigan
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
I wouldn't give much credence to commercial content sites like sfgate...I have a ton of articles on there (and eleswhere online) and I had no clue what I was talking about and nor did their content "editors". That's one of dozens of sites owned by Demand Media, who hired any semi-literate chimp who would churn out articles for them. They really don't care about accuracy, just money. Which can be considerable.

I know because I wrote for them for about seven years. And they rule Google's algorathims, and appear on the first page of many online searches but it's mostly complete armchair amateurs writing for these sites for money. (I was one!) lol.

Which is not to say content sites like this aren't right some of the time but this is NOT an authoritative source of information.

That said Chucks advice is usually spot on correct. :)
 
Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
26
Reaction score
36
Location
Spokane WA
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
A small raised bed vegetable garden. It's only 12 ft x 3 ft and about 12 inches high.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
3,717
Reaction score
3,418
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Do not put the chips in the soil. Put them in places like paths or as a mulch, so that you can remove them after they age half a year or more. They will break down with oxygen, but thats only in the top 2 inches or so.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top