There are worms in my dirt!


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Thanks, Shellyann, but I'm set. When I first discovered the worms there were a few smallish ones near the bottom of the container and now there is a whole colony of long worms that would make a hobby fisherman very excited. Not only have they grown, they appear to have multiplied and I have two bins.

That is just awesome!
 
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OMG! I don't think you want to start that, lol. Might end up with too much in there! I did see this woman on TV though that uses a jar instead of the toilet and then she pours it on a compost pile that's way in the back of her yard. I just wonder at how someone's health would affect the soil - I mean how many people drink as much water as they should, etc.?

How can you be sure there is enough heat to kill anything that should be killed -- after all "wee" is a human waste product.
Congrats on the worms. I compost lots of green waste. They can sure demolish a pile in short time. Am getting my bokashi composted started so that I can compost even more that is worm friendly.

By the way urine is sterile. I've never used it for fertilizer, but find it interesting. Here is a great link explaining the composition, methods, etc.

http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Outdoors/Archives/2013/Getting Dirty for Good Health.aspx

Give me a few more years, to get a little more crazy and I might try it:eek: It actually sounds much more reasonable to use than buying chemicals for adding nitrogen to the compost pile.:confused: Oops I must be getting crazier by the momento_O:D

Composting toilets are used in a large part of the world. New to me too, but for a cabin off the grid....:rolleyes:
 
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By the way urine is sterile. I've never used it for fertilizer, but find it interesting. Here is a great link explaining the composition, methods, etc.

http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/National-Wildlife/Outdoors/Archives/2013/Getting Dirty for Good Health.aspx

Give me a few more years, to get a little more crazy and I might try it:eek: It actually sounds much more reasonable to use than buying chemicals for adding nitrogen to the compost pile.:confused:
I don't know about urine being sterile, since it is the body's waste product and can contain yeast (the bad kind) and other remnants of illness, not to mention narcotics, but I think I can live without it being in my compost. There are too many other ways of getting nitrogen in the pile, and since you compost a lot of "green" it sounds like what you need is more "brown" anyway.

BTW, nothing about urine in that link you shared.
 
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That's awesome. I love earthworms. They are fascinating and helpful little creatures. Congratulations on your worms.
 
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I don't know about urine being sterile, since it is the body's waste product and can contain yeast (the bad kind) and other remnants of illness, not to mention narcotics, but I think I can live without it being in my compost. There are too many other ways of getting nitrogen in the pile, and since you compost a lot of "green" it sounds like what you need is more "brown" anyway.

BTW, nothing about urine in that link you shared.
Sorry Chanrell, I had just been reading this article and a couple of others along its line. http://www.nwedible.com/2013/03/how-to-use-pee-in-your-garden.html I really need to quit "bird walking" so much and realize when I jump from string to string and forum to forum.

I know Chanell, the idea of urine was quite thought provoking. :eek: Nothing that i have tried, but it keeps coming up in a variety of written scientific and gardening articles I have been reading lately with worms, soil health, macrobiotics and composting. It is true that urine from a healthy individual is sterile. Preferable from a male, since female urine is easily contaminated because of anatomy.
 
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I know Chanell, the idea of urine was quite thought provoking. :eek: Nothing that i have tried, but it keeps coming up in a variety of written scientific and gardening articles I have been reading lately with worms, soil health, macrobiotics and composting. It is true that urine from a healthy individual is sterile. Preferable from a male, since female urine is easily contaminated because of anatomy.
Well, seeing as how I am a female... LOL.

I dye fabric and urea is a chemical component of that process; it's actually used in some beauty products, but I wear gloves when dyeing fabric and you won't see me putting pee products on my skin, no matter how sterile! Some people drink it and it's also useful in fermentation, which is probably how people started using it on their compost, but it's just not for me. The worms get the job done just fine ;-)
 
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Worms are actually good for a compost pile, they help break it down to make soil. I have a friend who makes his own soil out of compost and has specific worms that he actually puts in his compost bins so they will break it down. Very interesting to see and witness the worms working like this.
 
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Worms are actually good for a compost pile, they help break it down to make soil. I have a friend who makes his own soil out of compost and has specific worms that he actually puts in his compost bins so they will break it down. Very interesting to see and witness the worms working like this.
It's amazing how much faster the process goes once the worms make their way into a bin and start to multiply. You can have composted scraps in a matter of weeks as opposed to months. I worry sometimes about the weather and how the temperature might affect them, but it doesn't seem to impact them much. I guess they burrow deeper into the ground to combat that.
 
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Hopefully moving our compost pile closer to the corn/bean field will help get more worms into it. I might buy a tub of nightcrawlers and throw into it for good measure though.

And I've found that urine can be an excellent fertilizer. I found out by starting to put just a wee bit (no pun intended) around the garden hoping the smell would help keep bunnies and such away. After the first couple times, we noticed that the grass around the edge of the garden was a lot greener and lusher than the rest of the lawn, and that the plants at the edge of the garden looked better than any of the other plants... I was sold. It's free and easy to obtain, and helps my plants grow better. I did find that it's possible to put too much on potted plants, but otherwise, it's excellent.
 

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A little off subject, it is still very cold outside in the mornings here, but it did get up to 45 degrees today with the forecast to be that warm for a few days. Our front yard is full of red breasted robins looking for worms, I don't understand first why the birds are still here and second is the ground to hard for them to get to the worms? I am sure the birds are hungry. It is a little strange that the birds stayed over the winter when it has been so cold.
 
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Pat, if I were you, I'd start feeding them with seeds and bread:) It will help them survive the winter:)
As for earthworms, I've always been scared of them and although I know that they're helpful creatures, I still don't want them to live in my flower pots:cautious:
 
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And I've found that urine can be an excellent fertilizer. I found out by starting to put just a wee bit (no pun intended) around the garden...
Careful with that - it's supposed to be good for your compost (I wouldn't do it), but I saw a program where these people had messed up patches of lawn because their child was constantly using their yard as a toilet (he wouldn't go in the house for some reason).
 
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Careful with that - it's supposed to be good for your compost (I wouldn't do it), but I saw a program where these people had messed up patches of lawn because their child was constantly using their yard as a toilet (he wouldn't go in the house for some reason).
Funny. I started putting it around our garden as a deterrent to rabbits and deer, and the grass around the edge of our garden (and plants nearest the edge of the garden) started growing like crazy, looking much better than the rest of the yard and garden respectively. Now, I think it is possible to overuse it, like with potted plants and such, as the plants do need more liquid than just that (such as dew and rain), and I wouldn't recommend doing it after drinking a lot of alcohol, as the alcohol probably would be detrimental to the plants, but I think back to when I was growing up and the best looking parts of the yard, where the grass grew thickest, greenest, and fastest, were along the run we had for my dog (where he would do his business), and wherever the neighbor's dog would sneak into our yard to tinkle and drop a deuce....
 
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...but I think back to when I was growing up and the best looking parts of the yard, where the grass grew thickest, greenest, and fastest, were along the run we had for my dog (where he would do his business), and wherever the neighbor's dog would sneak into our yard to tinkle and drop a deuce....
Interesting, though I still don't think I want to try it. It seems to me there would be some potential health risk in doing that. It's bad enough you could potentially get toxoplasmosis just from having cats use your yard as a bathroom; I think it's one thing if you only grow ornamentals and another if you grow edibles.
 
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There's a difference between cat feces and human urine, just like there's a difference between cat feces and cow and chicken feces (hence the last 2 being known as good fertilizers, while the first is completely useless). Talking about cat feces and toxoplasmosis, the danger there is from coming into contact with the feces and not getting properly cleaned soon enough (hence pregnant women shouldn't clean the litter box). There are people in great health who actually drink a cup of their own urine every day (See Bear Grylls - I think that's how you spell it - and Lyoto Machida). While I'm not gonna try that, I think that speaks a great deal about there not being any danger in using it as a plant nutrient booster.
 
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My father tried that drink your own urine business one time, and he's never done it again. (Someone he knew...) Urine and feces carry waste and toxins away from the body. Why would I want to put them back by drinking mine? I'm not Sheldon Cooper so I won't be filtering and processing my urine into clean water - let's hope life is never that dire.
 
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My grandfather was one of the pioneers of commercial worm-farming. He used to sell the waste from his beds as compost (he had truckloads of it, his was the largest worm farm in the world for many years)
 
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That sounds wonderful. Healthy soil actually hosts several organisms. The worms happen to be the most visible one. They may seem gross at first, but they really do keep the plants happy and healthy.

Worms help cultivate the garden as they tunnel their way around. They also eat dead leaves and other particles in the dirt, and when it comes out the other end, it becomes natural fertilizer. If the worms die and decompose, they become nutrients for your garden too.

You've certainly hit the jackpot on this one. That's such great news. :D
 
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...They also eat dead leaves and other particles in the dirt, and when it comes out the other end, it becomes natural fertilizer. If the worms die and decompose, they become nutrients for your garden too.

You've certainly hit the jackpot on this one. That's such great news. :D
I've never thought about what happened if or when the worms died. What is their lifespan? I have worms in my compost bins and they do a great job on the kitchen scraps. I try to use leaves for making leaf mold, though I sometimes add them to the compost after they are dry.
 
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I've never thought about what happened if or when the worms died. What is their lifespan? I have worms in my compost bins and they do a great job on the kitchen scraps. I try to use leaves for making leaf mold, though I sometimes add them to the compost after they are dry.
Some worms only live a few months. Others can live between 1 to 3 years. Then there are those earthworms which thrive for about 6 to 9 years. This is of course assuming they aren't eaten by birds or other creatures. They lay hundreds of eggs during their lifespan, and the cycle continues. It's kind of sad, but the circle of life is mother nature's way.

Some worms will aestivate during warm weather. It's like hibernation for hot climates. If they lack food, moisture and other resources, they sleep until the environment's more suitable. Don't worry. I'm sure your little garden helpers will be fine. :)
 

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