Soil for a new raised bed

Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
Pacific Northwest
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
Canada
I'm building a raised bed on top of what used to be a lawn. I'm thinking of using a 50/50 topsoil/compost mix.

Is this a good mix? Should I add anything else? Thanks.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Messages
743
Reaction score
1,433
Location
Essex, England
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
6a
Country
United Kingdom
It all Depends on what you are growing in it Pnwgardens. But as a General rule of thumb Your 50/50 Sounds fine. But make sure you are only Adding Compost with good water retention as Razed beds have a tendency to dry fast. & as Chuck says if it is not Sterile expect to be weeding a lot!
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
282
Reaction score
385
Location
Oregon
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
I reccomend a little bit of a lightening agent with water retention; something like vermiculite, perlite, or rice hulls. Manure, particularly aged stuff, is a really good amendment to add too, even if it does come with weeds.
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
Pacific Northwest
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
Canada
I reccomend a little bit of a lightening agent with water retention; something like vermiculite, perlite, or rice hulls. Manure, particularly aged stuff, is a really good amendment to add too, even if it does come with weeds.
If I add that kind if stuff will I have to replace it after it decomposes?
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
15,314
Reaction score
15,328
Location
Essex
Showcase(s):
3
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
Don't think perlite will decomposes. Add horse manure as it could be obtained free. Line the whole bed with well rotted manure and some bark mulch of the smallest size. You could advertise in freecycle to see if anyone could give you some free. Make sure you have screen top soil or you might be in all sorts of trouble. You can add horticultural grit which is far cheaper than perlite.
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
282
Reaction score
385
Location
Oregon
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
If I add that kind if stuff will I have to replace it after it decomposes?

Yeah. Horse manure and other organic materials like compost breakdown continuously and need replacing. I add aged horse manure to my raised beds every year, usually two or three times. Worms usually move in and eat up all the poop, turning it into nutrient rich castings. This can be sped up by covering beds when not in use with cardboard or shadecloth. A layer of leaves is always good too.

Perlite and vermiculite last for years. Ditto with other additives like rice hulls or zeolite. The rice hulls would breakdown fastest. Rock powders can also take years to fully breakdown and be absorbed.
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
15,314
Reaction score
15,328
Location
Essex
Showcase(s):
3
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
Yeah. Horse manure and other organic materials like compost breakdown continuously and need replacing. I add aged horse manure to my raised beds every year, usually two or three times. Worms usually move in and eat up all the poop, turning it into nutrient rich castings. This can be sped up by covering beds when not in use with cardboard or shadecloth. A layer of leaves is always good too.

Perlite and vermiculite last for years. Ditto with other additives like rice hulls or zeolite. The rice hulls would breakdown fastest. Rock powders can also take years to fully breakdown and be absorbed.
(y)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
27,197
Messages
260,510
Members
13,725
Latest member
livasccenquo1989

Latest Threads

Top