Should soaking seeds rise to the top of the glass?


Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
35
Reaction score
3
Location
Southeast Coastal Georgia
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
When I start my seeds in a clear glass, should the seeds that will sprout when I plant them, rise to the top of the glass? Some of the seeds stay on the bottom, and I'm wondering if they are either old or won't grow?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Logan

Logan
Joined
Mar 21, 2017
Messages
8,310
Reaction score
5,791
Location
redditch west Midlands UK
Hardiness Zone
1a
Country
United Kingdom
If the seeds on the top have taken in the water i think those are the ones that will germinate, I'd sow them all anyway you've got nothing to lose, only soak them for up to 24 hours.
I soaked some lupin seeds the ones that were bigger were floating but I sowed them all and not sure if i had more or not.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
8,906
Reaction score
4,139
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
The one's that float are the bad seeds as they don't weigh as much, meaning that something has happened to the interior of the seeds. A prime example of this is acorns. 99.9% of the time an acorn floats it will have a tiny hole in it where a pest has been. Same thing with corn seeds. But, just because a seed sinks doesn't necessarily mean it will germinate.
 
Joined
Mar 28, 2015
Messages
3,681
Reaction score
3,330
Location
Southern Chester County, PA, USA
Hardiness Zone
4 to 5 best for success.
Country
United States
forgot how it goes. but I just google it. the difference between bad and good seeds one sinks the other floats. so I leave that memory to google when I need to recall it.
 
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
1,864
Reaction score
1,712
Location
Kent
Country
United Kingdom
It`s just the same as testing eggs. The bad ones float, and the goodies sink. We have so many to sow this spring, but have put the big sowing day off for a couple of weeks because of the cold..... itching to start !! The propagator is ready to go :joyful:
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
2,893
Reaction score
1,223
Location
Port William
Showcase(s):
1
Country
United Kingdom
Sow them all. It's possible some of the floaters won't make it, but, then again, some of the sinkers might not.
It's not like they've got some kind of disease that they can spread...
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 5, 2017
Messages
1,194
Reaction score
1,078
Location
Atlantic Beach, Fl
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
I think it depends on the type of seed, but when I soak my moonflower vine (Ipomoea alba) seeds, some float, some don't, but it doesn't seem to affect the germination of the seeds.
 
Joined
Jan 25, 2021
Messages
59
Reaction score
60
Location
Byng, Oklahoma
Hardiness Zone
7
Country
United States
Just plant them. I generally plant several seeds in each little container, then when they come up and have their first true leaves, I pull out any weak or undersized sprouts. leaving one strong sprout. You do have plenty of seeds, don't you?
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
32
Reaction score
29
Country
United Kingdom
Provided I have enough seeds I try all the possibilities, some get soaked, some don't, some go direct into the soil, some in the cold greenhouse, some in a propagator. And I find that what worked last year is not always what works this year. Let's face it, most seed merchants give you far more seeds than you need, I noticed a packet of lettuce said 'average contents 2,000 seeds', that's enough to go into business if you only get 50% germination :) Over the last few years I have been looking in 'pound shop', they will do packets of 6 different sorts of veg seeds or salad seeds with maybe ten each of two tomato types, or twenty cabbage, or a pinch of lettuce, and so on. Sensible amounts at a sensible price rather than two pounds for one type and more seed than you would use in a lifetime, and they seem to grow okay.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
2,893
Reaction score
1,223
Location
Port William
Showcase(s):
1
Country
United Kingdom
Provided I have enough seeds I try all the possibilities, some get soaked, some don't, some go direct into the soil, some in the cold greenhouse, some in a propagator. And I find that what worked last year is not always what works this year. Let's face it, most seed merchants give you far more seeds than you need, I noticed a packet of lettuce said 'average contents 2,000 seeds', that's enough to go into business if you only get 50% germination :) Over the last few years I have been looking in 'pound shop', they will do packets of 6 different sorts of veg seeds or salad seeds with maybe ten each of two tomato types, or twenty cabbage, or a pinch of lettuce, and so on. Sensible amounts at a sensible price rather than two pounds for one type and more seed than you would use in a lifetime, and they seem to grow okay.
I stopped doing that because germination rates were so low.
Either I was making serious mistakes when sowing, or their handling of the seeds was poor.
It was, however, some time ago, so perhaps either they have changed their ways, or I, with experience, have changed mine.
Their is a place for large seed packets, however, as some seeds will germinate even after ten years, if well looked after, albeit at a diminished proportion.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
35
Reaction score
3
Location
Southeast Coastal Georgia
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I planted them all and will wait and see what happens. Of course, I won't remember which seeds floated and which sank, so as a researcher, I'm not qualified!
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top