NO winter weather here. Today I tilled and killed chickweed.

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2 more weeks before I can plant 350 candy onion plants. I planted 58 late hard neck garlic today, -2°f weather killed my other garlic plants. I have, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, chard, growing in 1 gallon pots. I planted a 25 ft row of Pac choy,60 seeds. I planted 300 candy onion seeds in the tiny green house weeks ago plants are 4" tall. I will plant, tomato seeds and pepper seeds in the other tiny green house March 1st. No winter weather here it was 71°f today with 30 mph wind.

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I how they grow. Cilantro is growing.
 
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I get chickweed every winter around here. I either eat it, cut it up for mulch or throw it in water to ferment (anaerobic tea).

It actually tastes good and is a good source of Vit C


Health Benefits

In traditional medicine, Chickweed has been used in the U.S. and around the world as a medicinal herb.

Digestion and weight management.
As a mild laxative and diuretic, it helps the body expel toxins and improves digestion. Studies on mice reveal that chickweed has a positive impact on body weight and food consumption.

Expectorant
Chickweed contains saponin which has been shown to break up mucus and soothe the bronchial tubes.

Wound healing and inflammation
Traditionally chickweed would be crushed into a poultice and used to relieve eye inflammation and as a salve to promote wound healing. With antiseptic and antifungal properties, it has been used to prevent cuts and wounds from becoming infected. These properties have also shown benefits to decrease inflammation and pain associated with arthritis.

Vitamins
Chickweed is a great source of vitamin C and has historically been used to treat and prevent scurvy.

Use

The tender leaves of chickweed have a fresh grassy taste. This makes them great to be tossed in raw in a salad or used as a garnish. Blend it into a pesto, add it to a stock, or nibble on some while out chasing turkeys for a great vitamin boost.

While still safe and edible, once chickweed begins to bloom it can become fibrous and stringy leaving unpleasant to eat.

CAUTION: Due to the diuretic and laxative properties, overconsumption of chickweed can lead to diarrhea. As with any diuretic, take caution if pregnant or breastfeeding. As with most herbs, use Chickweed in moderation.

Chickweed Nutrition Facts, 1 cup

  • Calories - 96
  • Total Fat - 1 g
  • Saturated Fat - 1 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat - 0 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat - 0 g
  • Cholesterol - 0 mg
  • Sodium - 0 mg
  • Potassium - 0 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate - 15 g
  • Dietary Fiber - 8 g
  • Sugars - 0 g
  • Protein - 6 g
  • Vitamin A - 4 %
  • Vitamin B - 120 %
 
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sorry I always thought you had to get chickweed out by the root
If I was 20 years old again I could probably pull chickweed up by the roots. If you young give that a try see if it works. My garden is 35'x 60' I can mow it then till it in 45 minutes. But soil needs to be tilled several more times to kill all that chick weed.
 
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Where you at Gary? Sounds like your weather is similar to mine.

I've been planning on mowing and tilling next month as well as starting seeds for cold weather crops like cabbage and broccoli. My green onions are already growing and I'll be transplanting them to a different area where they can go wild.

I also have the chickweed problem. Mowing and tilling several times helps. It also seems to vary which variety is more prevalent. Sometimes regular, sometimes mouse ear.

I've noticed that the regular seems to act as a mulch, keeping the soil shaded and damp. The mouse ear not so much.

I've been trying to find some information on how I might use this to advantage. And what the message is in how much and which type is growing. Something in or lacking in the soil that I might be able to correct.

Alas, most information on chickweed is related to getting rid of it.
 
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Where you at Gary? Sounds like your weather is similar to mine.

I've been planning on mowing and tilling next month as well as starting seeds for cold weather crops like cabbage and broccoli. My green onions are already growing and I'll be transplanting them to a different area where they can go wild.

I also have the chickweed problem. Mowing and tilling several times helps. It also seems to vary which variety is more prevalent. Sometimes regular, sometimes mouse ear.

I've noticed that the regular seems to act as a mulch, keeping the soil shaded and damp. The mouse ear not so much.

I've been trying to find some information on how I might use this to advantage. And what the message is in how much and which type is growing. Something in or lacking in the soil that I might be able to correct.

Alas, most information on chickweed is related to getting rid of it.

We live in Murfreesboro TN about 30 miles south/east of Nashville TN. Chickweed is good to eat like lettuce in cool weather. I put chickweed on, sandwiches, tacos, enchiladas, salads. I see a lot of people out picking chickweed in spring. Chickweed gets bitter in hot weather. I have tried to grow, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, but our spring weather is only 6 weeks long, we have 90°f weather in May and all those plants grow flowers and seeds. I have learned to grow Pak Choy it grows good in cool and hot weather too and can be eaten as lettuce or cabbage. I planted 60 pak choy seeds 3 days ago, it does great grown in garden soil in a bed shape 32" wide 6" apart with 5 rows side by side 6" space between rows. 250 Pak Choy seeds are $2 on Ebay free postage.
 
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Lovely day here too. Just reading your posts. It is so interesting hearing you talk about chickweed - not something I worry about in my garden in the UK! :)
 
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Murfreesboro huh? Ever heard about Uncle Tony?

You're going to get warmer than me sooner.

I tried to get the family interested in eating chickweed, our most bountiful crop. But nope. Pak Choy is something we do eat, I'll look for seed.
 

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