My 'wild' composting, some photos


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I call it 'wild' because it is in the open. I had posted a thread before. I have two pits of about a cubic foot each, divided by a zinc plate partition between them... just for easy access to one another if need be. We put all our organic [all veg] scraps into it. One pit is used while the other will be either empty or in a stage left for breaking down more. I keep on adding wood ash in between [from the hot water boiler - twigs, coconut shells, dry leaves, paper [no plastic or laminated sheets are put - I am particular of segregating these nasty things], etc. So the ash is not toxic. I also spread the ash to the other plant bases and beds. When one pit is full, I layer the top with some wood ash and sometimes I add green leaves of almond which is always available. I cover this pit after turning the contents and mixing some ash too. Then I'll leave this for more than a month. I sprinkle water to it once in a while to keep it moist. Of course, ants are attracted to this but they will take only a small amount they want! Rats also look for something at times. When I feel the contents are 'composted' - turns black, does not stick to fingers, is warm, moist and no smell, I empty the pit and transfer the contents into a plastic bag till further use. Sometimes I fail to keep the bagged contents moist. Moisture is needed to keep the organisms in it alive [beneficial]. I took some photos recently. These black envelopes we get from online purchases are so handy! I also grow a few plants in these!

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The pit on the left is closed [breaking down]. The one on the right is a current pit.

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Kitchen scrap is collected in a bin near the kitchen.
A good amount of tea leaves and coffee grounds - I mix all that - are added to the pit.

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Ready compost is transferred into an envelope for some days of storage [in shade].

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Bad photo of compost!
 
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zigs

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Nice one Dinu :)

Have you tried adding layers of crumpled cardboard with the kitchen waste? Gives a better carbon/nitrogen ratio :)
 
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Interesting! I've always read that compost piles should be a minimum of three square feet, but maybe that's for cooler climates?

Anyway I do much the same thing; have a bowl on the kitchen counter for veg scraps and coffee grounds (plus filters.) I layer it with dried leaves. Mine is made of wood pallets for the bottom and sides and sits behind the garden shed so it's out of sight.
 
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Interesting! I've always read that compost piles should be a minimum of three square feet, but maybe that's for cooler climates?

Anyway I do much the same thing; have a bowl on the kitchen counter for veg scraps and coffee grounds (plus filters.) I layer it with dried leaves. Mine is made of wood pallets for the bottom and sides and sits behind the garden shed so it's out of sight.
With respect to the 3-sq/ft comment, I believe you're thinking of creating a "hot" compost pile (actually the recommended minimum is 3-cubic feet to create a habitat for hot-composting).

All my compost piles are small, like the OP's, it works just as fine and it attracts many different types of organisms. BTW, I no longer have a dedicated compost pile, I simply find an area that has heavy mulch and put the kitchen scraps at the bottom of the leaf litter. In the winter I usually use my main garden to dump waste, but move around the yard during the growing season.
 
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Actually in my opinion, the dimensions should match the amount and rate of materials being added within a certain period of time. Too big a pit and too less material in longer period will have no purpose. Yes, deeper pits will have a very warm compost!

@zigs I have not added cardboard. Thanks for this.
 

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