My 59 Days experience trying to get straight long radishes


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I never liked radishes, but I happened to have some seeds this year, so I threw them on the ground in a spot I recently dug up my grass to make an area for growing. The radish plant is a very cool looking plant if you let it grow (one of my plants if about four feet tall) and the bees love its flower.
 
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Definitely a tutorial on how to not grow radishes.
 
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Definitely a tutorial on how to not grow radishes.
I happen to be quite content with the radishes that I have grown, yes they may not have that Prize-winning look but where they lack in looks they make up in taste. A small price to pay when growing organically.
 
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I thought the object of your message was to grow long straight radishes organically. The main thing you did wrong was to transplant them. Very few root crops can be transplanted. By transplanting you slowed down the rate of growth. That variety of radish, Candelo di Fuoco, is an early-mid season radish and matures in about 35-40 days from planting of seed. If you would have direct sowed the seed you would have had straight radishes and a lot sooner too.
 
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I thought the object of your message was to grow long straight radishes organically. The main thing you did wrong was to transplant them. Very few root crops can be transplanted. By transplanting you slowed down the rate of growth. That variety of radish, Candelo di Fuoco, is an early-mid season radish and matures in about 35-40 days from planting of seed. If you would have direct sowed the seed you would have had straight radishes and a lot sooner too.
I grew these radishes in Zone 10A. So I guess starting them in Mid January indoors, I would presume that would make sense.
As for transplanting I always find seedlings to be a bit vulnerable when sowing directly into the ground or in a permanent area when they have not established a healthy root system.

I'm quite sure that the seed tray did not restrict the development of the roots at that time prior to root development and I sure took special care in making sure that there was no possibility of transplant shock.

Whatever the reason next time I will try to sow the seeds in a permanent area and for two weeks every night with a flashlight Hunt snails and slugs until my radishes have created a solid foundation.

Thanks for your advice.
 
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In 10A you can direct sow at any time. The reason that your radishes were crooked is because when you transplanted the seedlings the root was bent and that root would become the future radish. Also if you fertilize earlier the roots will form into the actual radish earlier. There is an organic product called Sluggo Plus that is the cure for slugs and snails. 100% organic and OMRI rated. I too am a totally organic gardener and would never use anything on my food not totally organic. I don't have a snail and slug problem but I do have a pill bug problem and the Sluggo Plus works wonders on them too.
 
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In 10A you can direct sow at any time. The reason that your radishes were crooked is because when you transplanted the seedlings the root was bent and that root would become the future radish. Also if you fertilize earlier the roots will form into the actual radish earlier. There is an organic product called Sluggo Plus that is the cure for slugs and snails. 100% organic and OMRI rated. I too am a totally organic gardener and would never use anything on my food not totally organic. I don't have a snail and slug problem but I do have a pill bug problem and the Sluggo Plus works wonders on them too.
Thanks for taking the time to share your much-appreciated expertise, now I know who to contact when I have an issue :)
 
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YouPlantTube, slugs and snails can be killed off with diatomaceous earth. It sits their little tummies open with its sharp edges. Most nurseries carry it, as do big box stores. Organic, no harm to humans or mammals, and it has worked for us when we lived up north. Just sprinkle it generously around your radishes, or anything else that is being damaged by slugs or snails.
 

Meadowlark

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I've never heard of transplanting radishes. They are among, if not the easiest , garden veggie to start from seed. Here in zone 8, I can start them in the garden any time except the very hottest months of July and August...could start them then but they would not produce in the heat.

Last year I noticed the local box store was selling corn plants for transplanting...and astonishingly people were actually. buying them. I just shook my head in amazement.
 
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I've never heard of transplanting radishes. They are among, if not the easiest , garden veggie to start from seed. Here in zone 8, I can start them in the garden any time except the very hottest months of July and August...could start them then but they would not produce in the heat.

Last year I noticed the local box store was selling corn plants for transplanting...and astonishingly people were actually. buying them. I just shook my head in amazement.
Diatomaceous earth I did a Google search for it at first glance it looks like some sort of white powder.
I live on an island in the Mediterranean Sea so I'm not quite sure if it is available here.
I'll see if it's available. Thanks for the advice.
 
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Diatomaceous earth is made from the fossilized remains of tiny organisms called diatoms. If you can't find DE, try ground up sea shells. All you need is something with a cutting edge and that is small enough, not necessarily a powder form, that will take care of the pests.
 
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Yes, diatomaceous earth works very well..........until it gets damp
 

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