Fun fact of the day:


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MaryMary

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Researchers observed ten captive greater vasa parrots, an African species native to Madagascar and the Comoro Islands, for eight months. The greater vasa parrots are the first animals (other than humans) to be seen using tools to grind something to powder. They grasp pebbles or date seeds in their beaks and use them to grind cockle shells to a powder, which they then eat. They also were seen using the tools as wedges inserted into the cracks to break them into smaller pieces for easier consumption.

They are among few documented cases of direct tool sharing; one bird would approach another and take their tool away, in order to use it themselves! The link has a video, where they show the use of the tool, both to grind and as a wedge. (They put the curve of their beak along the outside of the shell, and use their tongues to manipulate the pebble against the inside.) They also show "Tolerated theft of pebble" and "Protested theft of pebble." :ROFLMAO:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/these-parrots-use-pebbles-tools-grind-seashells-180957584/


It was the five male parrots observed grinding the shells. They would then regurgitate the calcium "pellets" to feed the females. (It's nice when a guy makes dinner for you. :rolleyes: )
 
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On the subject of weird laws, there is a city called Chester near where I live. There is an old law there saying it's ok to shoot a Welshman after sunset with a crossbow if he is within the city walls :eek: :LOL:
 
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On the subject of weird laws, there is a city called Chester near where I live. There is an old law there saying it's ok to shoot a Welshman after sunset with a crossbow if he is within the city walls :eek: :LOL:
Lets hope that Welshman has the right body clock, early to bed, at su set to be precise :eek:
 

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Hey!! @Beverly!! Yoo-hoo!! :D

Sorry to abruptly yank you into the thread like this, but your post is the inspiration for today's fun fact. :)

If i catch a wasp of any size (...) that wasp is going to die at my hands, guaranteed. You will say that it is the natural way for wasps to eat caterpillars, but it is the natural way for all of nature to have some sort of predator, and if you are a wasp, that predator would be me. The wasps that come into my garden are scared to death of me, and i like it that way :eek::D

Your wording is wonderful. You sound like Clint Eastwood, Liam Neeson, and Robert De Niro, all rolled into one! :ROFLMAO: Bravo!! I didn't really have anything to say about tropical milkweed, so I didn't jump in the thread.:oops: But since this is "Chat," and I've given everyone permission to hijack this thread with any facts they choose, I figured I'd take the opportunity to give you a shout out! :sneaky:


Today's fun fact is that Beverly should never plant certain varieties of corn and cotton. :whistle:

There are some corn and cotton plants, that when eaten by caterpillars, will release chemicals into the air that draw parasitic wasps to the plant. Even the recorded sound of caterpillars chewing on leaves will trigger the release of these chemicals. Without being touched - the plant acts like it can hear. :eek:


 
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Sorry to abruptly yank you into the thread like this, but your post is the inspiration for today's fun fact. :)
MaryMary well i've just gotten in from pulling up all my cotton plants and thank you for your hilarious post and informative video. I do understand the value of some parasitic wasps...just not in my garden
laughing.gif
i am happy to lend myself to this thread. I really like it but have had minimal computer time available for the last couple of weeks. Sometimes life seems to happen all at the same time.
 

MaryMary

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@Becky, I found these articles a couple months ago, and I've been saving them for you. I thought you might be interested in reading them. :)


Scientists have collected and summarized studies looking at how video games can shape our brains and behavior. Research to date suggests that playing video games can change the brain regions responsible for attention and visuospatial skills and make them more efficient. The researchers also looked at studies exploring brain regions associated with the reward system, and how these are related to video game addiction.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170622103824.htm

Playing "action" video games improves a visual ability crucial for tasks like reading and driving at night, a new study says. The ability, called contrast sensitivity function, allows people to discern even subtle changes in shades of gray against a uniformly colored backdrop.

It's also one of the first visual aptitudes to fade with age.

That's why a regular regimen of action video game training can provide long-lasting visual power, according to work led by Daphne Bavelier of the University of Rochester.

Games for Better Vision

Previous research shows that gaming improves other visual skills, such as the ability to track several objects at the same time and paying attention to a series of fast-moving events, Bavelier said. https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/03/090329-video-game-vision.html

Action video gamers tend to be more attune to their surroundings while performing tasks like driving down a residential street, where they may be more likely to pick out a child running after a ball than a non-video gamer. ....(snip)... people who play action video games can process visual information more quickly and can track 30 percent more objects than non video game players. https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/0528_030528_videogames.html

Game on, Becky!! :D

 
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Wow, those are certainly very interesting points! I was actually thinking about the benefits of gaming the other day - I know that it can help with problem solving abilities, but I was wondering about the effect of gaming as we age? It certainly seems to be the case that learning new things can help keep the mind sharp, and I wonder if gaming works in the same way. Certainly when I'm retired I'll be playing lots of games, so I hope so! :cool:
 

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I hadn't really thought about it before, but it does make sense that if you live or die depending on whether you see that enemy - you'd be more likely to have better observation skills. And better reflexes / reaction time, too! :cool:

30% better!! :woot: Woot!

"Turn that off, it'll rot your brain!!" :LOL:
 
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"Turn that off, it'll rot your brain!!" :LOL:
Haha I used to get told that all the time! My mum was a proper telly addict, she used to watch soap operas and all kinds of rubbish, so it felt more than a little hypocritical! :rolleyes:
 
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What is a Sage.

A Sage is a profoundly wise person. It is a label that has to be earned and the word Sage is then used by others to describe the individual. Not an egotistical person who places the label of Sage on himself or herself,;)

Sage is also an evergreen shrub with dusty green-grey leaves and woody stems. There are many varieties of sage, but the species used for culinary purposes is known as common sage, garden sage, or Salvia officinalis:). In addition to culinary use, this herb is also used medicinally(y) and even simply as an ornamental shrub.

Fact of the Day..............
 

MaryMary

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@Chuck, I remember back in March, @trail twister posted a thread in which you commented that you had never seen a hawk eat carrion.

When I read this, I wanted you to see it, and couldn't decide where to put it, so it's a Fun fact of the day!! :giggle:





Here is the article I read:



I guess cows, squirrels, and Appalachian rabbits have been seen eating meat. The squirrels actually hunt and kill lemmings! :jawdrop:

 
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@Chuck, I remember back in March, @trail twister posted a thread in which you commented that you had never seen a hawk eat carrion.

When I read this, I wanted you to see it, and couldn't decide where to put it, so it's a Fun fact of the day!! :giggle:





Here is the article I read:



I guess cows, squirrels, and Appalachian rabbits have been seen eating meat. The squirrels actually hunt and kill lemmings! :jawdrop:

Good Grief! I am surrounded by squirrels, rabbits and cows. HELP!!! AND i AM GETTING TOO OLD TO DEFEND MYSELF
 

Logan

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I've just googled it and their stomachs aren't designed to eat meat, they would get tummy ache and they could die, they need a lot of fiber.
 
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MaryMary

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Good Grief! I am surrounded by squirrels, rabbits and cows. HELP!!! AND i AM GETTING TOO OLD TO DEFEND MYSELF

You don't fool me! You're probably firing up the grill and trying to figure out how to bait them in right now!!! :ROFLMAO:



I've just googled it and their stomachs aren't designed to eat meat, they would get tummy ache and they could die, they need a lot of fiber.
Logan, I am a little confused by your answer. They are finding it and eating it on their own! (I could see that their teeth aren't designed for ripping and chewing meat. Or that it might be hard to pass through the intestine without enough fiber. But I don't think the amount they are choosing to eat would be fatal.)

Plants, especially plant proteins would be especially hard to find in the Yukon in the winter; I'd take a stomach ache over agonizing slow death by starvation any day of the week! (y)

Yukon = 3 to 7 feet average annual snowfall. (Between .9 to a little over 2 meters.) Plants? ... What plants?!?
 
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