Epsom Salt? Tomatoes & Weeds: I don't get it

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hi, all! I'm a frequent Pinterest user. I often see on there that Epsom salt is great for growing tomatoes. I also often see that Epsom salt is an ingredient in DIY "natural" weed killers. I have a ton of the stuff on hand... And I'm growing tomatoes. I'm afraid, though, of putting something that is claimed to be helpful in promoting growth and ALSO helpful in promoting the death of plants. I don't get it.
Does Epsom salt promote growth of tomatoes?
Does Epsom salt kill weeds?
Is it safe for my tomatoes? Or should I skip it?
 
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I wouldn't use it (and I sure wouldn't trust pinterest as a reliable source for anything. Pinterest is a giant corporate ad-driven content repository for whatever random people looking for views and likes feel like posting.) :whistle: Epsom salt is not a very effective weed-killer either. Arsenic and lead and other heavy metals occur "naturally" in soil and water; that doesn't mean it's a great idea to add them to the environment.

Epsom salt might be OK for occasional use in extremely poor soil. But it will probably leave a residue in the soil that will kill microbes. For weeds, pull by hand or mulch heavily to prevent them in the first place. My tomatoes grow so fast weeds aren't much of an issue in the first place.

Is your soil sandy or clay-ey? If so I would amend it with compost and/or organic materials such as leaves, grass, eggshells and other materials that will break down naturally over time.
 
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I've used it. A dose of Epsom salts ( Magnesium sulphate ) is useful if you have sandy soil & you find the lower leaves of your maturing tomato plants turn yellow. One application of around just 15 grammes to 10 litres water is sufficient. Just water in lightly round the plant/s base as normal. It doesn't affect the taste. It doesn't kill weeds. I think it is mainly used when growing under glass or in grow bags - which I suspect from your location you may not do anyway. I would agree with Beth - digging in organic compost if you can source it is helpful.
 
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Epsom salts is not a weed killer although I suppose you could kill a plant with it if you applied enough of it. I am in alkaline soils and plants have difficulty up taking calcium although limestone is the bedrock here. Without calcium up take blossom end rot becomes very severe and Epsom salts completely eliminates BER when used at time of transplanting and when blossoms start to set fruit. I use a good handful scattered around the base of the plant and water it in. I don't know what it does in acidic soils but it is a must have here.
 
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Never heard of Epsom salt being a weed killer. I have heard people rave about Epsom salts and tomatoes before, and I'm sure it does work for a lot of people, however, I'm a big believer in compost and compost tea for plants.
 
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I have also heard of the use of Epson salt in the garden, but never did put it to practice because of mix information as you mention. My front yard at the old house is very claying, and I couldn't grow anything there, plus the root of a huge tree spreading every where. That was the spot I intended to use Epson salt.
 
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I suppose that Epsom salts could be a double edged sword depending on the concentration you apply on the plants. Its a norm that anything used in excess however good can turn out to be harmful. Epson salts are good when applied on tomato plants because they supply chlorine which is an essential micronutrient necessary for biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other pigments in plants.
 

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