Another harmful insect found


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In all my decades of living in Texas I have never seen this insect. I first spotted them on my Texas Mountain Laurel bush 3 days ago. I didn't know what they were up to so I watched them. They look very similar to a milkweed bug but they aren't. They are between 1/4" and 1/2" long and are very soft bodied. Once I determined that they are harmful I sprayed with spinosad and that did them in. I haven't seen them on any of my garden vegetables, just the mountain laurel. The following pictures are what he looks like and the damage he does. He only attacks new growth.
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JBtheExplorer

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Red Mountain Laurel bug

"These lnsects can disfigure the TX mountain laurel foliage, but they do not cause serious damage"

"Red mountain laurel mirids, Lopidea major, are quite stunning. They are smallish, flattened, oval-shaped bugs that are a striking red and black. These insects have piercing-sucking mouthparts that they use to feed on plant juices. While the feeding can cause damage to the leaves- often disfiguring new growth- they do not seem to harm the tree overall."
 
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Joined
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United States
Red Mountain Laurel bug

"These lnsects can disfigure the TX mountain laurel foliage, but they do not cause serious damage"

"Red mountain laurel mirids, Lopidea major, are quite stunning. They are smallish, flattened, oval-shaped bugs that are a striking red and black. These insects have piercing-sucking mouthparts that they use to feed on plant juices. While the feeding can cause damage to the leaves- often disfiguring new growth- they do not seem to harm the tree overall."
I am worried that the damage they cause is on the growth of next years blooms. Don't know, just have to wait and see.
 

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