12 September 2021 Concord Grapes


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12 September 2021 Concord Grapes​

Posted on 09/12/2021 by Durgan
https://durgan.org/2021/September 2021/12 September 2021 Concord Grapes/HTML/ 12 September 2021 Concord Grapes
Twenty five pounds of grapes were obtained. The substrates were mostly removed by swiping across chicken wire mesh screen. It started to rain so I left turning into juice until tomorrow. It requires about 2 pounds of grapes to make liter of slurry juice. I buy more grapes as required from a grower in my area for 22 dollars a bushel. I need about five bushels, pick your own.
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Meadowlark

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$22 a bushel...I'd give you a bushel or two of muscadines if in proximity. I'd like to see your juice technique.
 
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I'm going to the field today to look at the Concord grapes. I need about 5 buhels, which will be made into juice. Also the batch started yesterday need be finished today. The method will be documented.
 
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13 September 2021 Concord Grapes Processing​

Posted on 09/13/2021 by Durgan
https://durgan.org/2021/September 2021/13 September 2021 Concord Grapes Processing/HTML/ 13 September 2021 Concord Grapes Processing
Procesed my garden Concord grapes 25 pounds into 9 liters of pressure juice at 15 PSI for 15 minutes. The grapes were cooked, blended into a slurry, strained through a 2 mm mesh, and pressure canned. The residue was mostly seed fed to birds. About 5 liters of water was added to make the juice drinkable. The end product is a bit tart since the grapes were picked too soon but is acceptable. I visited a commercial grower and he informed me the grapes should be left on the vine for two more weeks to get sweeter. Concord grapes make a pleasant drink.
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Meadowlark

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For comparison, here's Meadowlark's muscadine juice. Very tasty. Extremely healthy. No sugar added...but the "drinker" can sweeten to taste when drinking. No water added, but again the drinker can cut with water when consuming if desired.

Due to the high acid content, water bath processing is entirely sufficient to aid storage, but it won't be long before it is consumed. This is the first batch of several gallons of juice to come.
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I would appreciate your processing method.

I figured I could use Welches canned juice. I took a glass per day for about a month. I quit since it was found to be repulsive.Whatever they are doing in the processing it is NOT pure juice as their babble indicates. My juice is economical and pure except for a bit of water added to make is a bit thinner.
 
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You made me curious about Welch's 100% Concord Grape Juice.

First, I looked at the ingredient list.
• It is made from 100% grape juice, but not 100% Concord grape juice.
• Ascorbic acid and citric acid are added, oubtlessly in small quantities, but these additives could affect the taste.
• Any juice that is concentrated and then rehydrated could end with differing ratios of water, sugar, and other solids.
Perhaps Welch's rehydrate their concentrate differently.

Then I found this article.


Two points from the article. First, they aren't completely certain of the sources of the heavy metals, and second, organic certification did not reduce the risk.

Of course, wine has similar risks, if not worse.

This brought me back to thinking about the pH of both foods and water (for drinking and irrigation), but this post is already long and convoluted enough.
 

Meadowlark

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Durgan,

My approach is simple....pretty much like making jelly but without the pectin and sugar.

Clean the grapes removing all the woody stems...these negatively affect the taste adding bitterness. Cover with water in a big pot and simmer, never boiling, until the grapes fall apart. You can use something like a potato masher to get them effectively squeezed or some other tool but avoid overdoing the smashing to prevent adding any bitterness.

Strain through a cheesecloth leaving the whole "mess" to drain overnight into a pan in the refrigerator. Strain it again the next day and then water bath can it. I store in the refrigerator primarily cause I like to drink it cold but it will keep just fine at room temps several months. .

As a drink, you can add water as desired to dilute it or on the rocks or whatever. I like it straight myself getting those unique muscadine flavors. I add a little artificial sweetener but some prefer sugar. Sipped slowly its a very enjoyable, unique drink to me.
 
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Durgan,

My approach is simple....pretty much like making jelly but without the pectin and sugar.

Clean the grapes removing all the woody stems...these negatively affect the taste adding bitterness. Cover with water in a big pot and simmer, never boiling, until the grapes fall apart. You can use something like a potato masher to get them effectively squeezed or some other tool but avoid overdoing the smashing to prevent adding any bitterness.

Strain through a cheesecloth leaving the whole "mess" to drain overnight into a pan in the refrigerator. Strain it again the next day and then water bath can it. I store in the refrigerator primarily cause I like to drink it cold but it will keep just fine at room temps several months. .

As a drink, you can add water as desired to dilute it or on the rocks or whatever. I like it straight myself getting those unique muscadine flavors. I add a little artificial sweetener but some prefer sugar. Sipped slowly its a very enjoyable, unique drink to me.
You be using old methods. There are now simple machines to simplify. Mechanical strainers to utilize most of the grapes. I basically use everything except the seeds. Quick. Gramma's methods are passé.
 

Meadowlark

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LOL @ labels of passé and old methods. Excuse me if I completely reject your comments...and choose instead to continue my 100% pure and simple approach. I would be honored indeed if my Grandma approved my approach....I have absolutely no doubt she would approve the tasty result.
 
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