Worm tubes for the garden


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I've just googled Swallowtails. They really are gorgeous! I believe they live in my area too, but they're very rare here. So far, I saw them maybe once or twice.
If you grow parsley, dill, or fennel outdoors, they will find you! The giant one likes citrus. I get a few caterpillars on my Meyer lemon every year.

This is so awesome, thank you so much for posting this. This is exactly what I have been looking for. I have been trying to find a way to incorporate worms into my gardening plans. I think they are an awesome way to enrich soil and keep it perfect for great plant growth.
You're welcome! The tubes are for composting, the worms should already be in the soil, so you don't really have to do anything to incorporate them. This is really about recycling scraps, though there's the combined benefit of it being directly in the garden bed. Because of the amount of space you have, you should consider trench composting your first year.

 
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That is an idea I did not think about. I am going to go and contemplate this. It is a bit time consuming but may be better for the soil and future planting in the end.
 
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That is an idea I did not think about. I am going to go and contemplate this. It is a bit time consuming but may be better for the soil and future planting in the end.
Gardening is time consuming. This kind of compost is a do it now, reap the benefits later sort of thing. You would use this approach to prepare beds for spring planting. It's no more time consuming than constantly turning compost in a bed or bin. In fact, it's probably less involved.
 
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My friends want to do aquaponics with their garden because they are foreseeing a very harsh dry summer and they feel that it would be the best bet. I want to try the worms and mulch method. Guess we will see who is right.
 
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My friends want to do aquaponics with their garden because they are foreseeing a very harsh dry summer and they feel that it would be the best bet. I want to try the worms and mulch method. Guess we will see who is right.
I think the two systems are completely different. Aquaponics is a way to grow food without the need for soil. It's not a simple thing and it requires a lot of preparation and equipment. I think the use of the towers allows you to grow more in less space, and there may be some truth to another advantage in that you don't have the same pathogens as soil, but it's not as if water automatically inhibits unwanted growth like bacteria. and since some plants don't like their roots wet, it would seem limited.
 
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Oh I know they are different. I am saying that is what they have chosen to do to offset for the possible major drought. They are setting up a aquaponics system with water filtration and cycling. I think I will just stick with mulch and worms. The aquaponics system seems to much to work with for me right now. Maybe in the future I will try it, but having to maintain that right now is not very feasible with my busy scheduled.
 
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Oh I know they are different. I am saying that is what they have chosen to do to offset for the possible major drought....
My point was that it's like comparing apples and oranges. I should have said aeroponics before when referencing the vertical planters. Good for your friends, but I believe aquaponics would limit you in ways you don't need. There are other ways to deal drought, including rainwater catch systems to store water for dry the dry period.
 
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Unfortunately, it does not rain enough here for a rainwater catch system to be any help. It is very dry here.... desert. I want to get the money to get a atmosphere water generator, it wont be able to draw much out of the air, but enough to help. Maybe about 2 possibly 3 gallons a day would be a great benefit.
 
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Unfortunately, it does not rain enough here for a rainwater catch system to be any help. It is very dry here.... desert. I want to get the money to get a atmosphere water generator, it wont be able to draw much out of the air, but enough to help. Maybe about 2 possibly 3 gallons a day would be a great benefit.
That's a thought! Two to three gallons a day will definitely add up by the end of the week. Of course it depends on how many plants and what kind of area you need to water. However, if you get even one inch of rain in a storm even a few times a year, you could collect a lot of rain using the right collection system.

Depending on land elevation where you are, you may want to look into the idea of a dew pond. You could also look into methods that don't use a lot of water like hugelkulture. What is the average annual rainfall for your area?
 
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Well the plan is to create a green house approximately 1 acre in size (yes I know that is big) and high enough (approximate 25 to 30 feet, just high enough for the fruit trees) with a atmosphere water generator and heating system connected directly to my kitchen as part of it. I know this is a major project, but it is what we have always wanted. That way when I am cooking, if I need a tomato I just walk into the green house and pick one and not have to cross a yard to get to it. LOL Basically the backside of our home will be the greenhouse. One day when we finally get this, I will send pictures.
 
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Well the plan is to create a green house approximately 1 acre in size (yes I know that is big) and high enough (approximate 25 to 30 feet, just high enough for the fruit trees) with a atmosphere water generator and heating system connected directly to my kitchen as part of it. I know this is a major project, but it is what we have always wanted. That way when I am cooking, if I need a tomato I just walk into the green house and pick one and not have to cross a yard to get to it. LOL Basically the backside of our home will be the greenhouse. One day when we finally get this, I will send pictures.
Wow. That is major. You may as well start storing up water now, lol. Might I suggest a few raised beds in the meantime while you work toward your dream greenhouse? You could experiment with Hugelkulture and with wicking beds. Can you recycle gray water where you live? That would really help your garden.
 
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Problem with the area I am in, we have dead high alkali soil and it is lumpy throughout the property. I would have to level and enrich the soil. It is more work then I either have time or patience for right now.... especially since I have a damaged spinal cord which makes things a bit more difficult. So a green house is the best option at the moment. It would help to less water usage and keep the plants safe.
 
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Problem with the area I am in, we have dead high alkali soil and it is lumpy throughout the property. I would have to level and enrich the soil. It is more work then I either have time or patience for right now.... especially since I have a damaged spinal cord which makes things a bit more difficult. So a green house is the best option at the moment. It would help to less water usage and keep the plants safe.
No you wouldn't That's the whole point of raised beds. You really should do at least one Hugelkultur mound. You could get started with a few edibles until you got that greenhouse built. You could probably set up a wicking bed in a raised bed as well.
 
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BTW, everyone, to the original topic of this thread, I plan to put my first worm tube to work in garden #3 next week!. Just about done with redoing that small raised bed.
 
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I have a compost bin going in my yard, actually, I usually have two. When the first one is full, I start using the second one. By the time that one is full, the first one is ready to be sifted and used in the garden. Lately though, I have been thinking about starting a worm tube. It doesn't take up much space, and if I don't bury it, I can harvest the worm tea to use in the garden. It seems a lot simpler and more economical than making or buying worm bins.

Have any of you tried worm tubes in your gardens?

For those who have no idea what I am talking about...




Here's a link for that second one: http://midwestpermaculture.com/2012/11/how-to-build-a-worm-tower/
I like this idea, actually I built a barrel for that purpose but it need some modification at the bottom so one can get the final compost and the compost tea. Never put worms in it but this Spring I'm buying some Night Crawlers. Here is what I did

I got the idea from something like this:




 
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Interesting, @Gilcano. So you have been composting in this blue barrel without the worms, or is this the newer version? Do you put plants in the open spaces in the container? I've decided to give the worm tube a go within the next week. I just have to get the PVC and borrow a drill to add the holes to the bottom.
 
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Interesting, @Gilcano. So you have been composting in this blue barrel without the worms, or is this the newer version? Do you put plants in the open spaces in the container? I've decided to give the worm tube a go within the next week. I just have to get the PVC and borrow a drill to add the holes to the bottom.
@Chanell, I was just using the barrel as a container for planting and never added worms to it. This coming Spring I want to order some Night Crawlers see link http://unclejimswormfarm.com/index.php/Live-Worms/250-Super-Reds-European-Night-Crawlers/flypage.tpl.html but first I need to fix the bottom to be able to get access to the final product or compost. I think is a great idea because in the center tube/worm tube you can dump the food scraps and such and the worm will convert it to vermicompost and the tube have holes so the worm can go around the container in the soil and aerated the soil. Same concept that your tube in the garden but this one is in the barrel.
 
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