White Fungus on Seedlings (just germinated)?

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Hi guys,

I've got a few seedlings on the go and have noticed that some of them have very fine white like hairs surrounding them. I've had a look on google and it looks like it may be a result of overwatering but I'd be grateful for any advice from more experienced gardeners as I'm just starting out.

I have removed the seedling trays out of their damp enclosures to allow them to dry out a little and will maintain a moist soil rather than wet (they did look sodden).

Also a side question - Is it always necessary to germinate seeds in the dark? Can they germinate in day light as long as they have sufficient soil coverage?

This forum has been fantastic so far, very grateful for any and all input

Thanks,

Patrick
 
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That fibrous white stuff is probably a beneficial fungi called tricoderma.
Most seeds do not need sunlight to germinate and as long as they are covered it doesn't make any difference. However, lettuce seeds seem to germinate better when they are open to sunlight.
The main thing about covering seeds with soil is planting them too deep. Some tiny seeds only need a very thin covering while a seed like a bean is best at 1/2-1 inch deep
 

alp

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Some seeds benefit from having light during germination. The instructions on the packet usually tell you that. If you have delicate seeds, might be a good idea to sterilise the compost before trying to germinate them. That way, you reduce the chance of having gnats flying around your greenhouse soon after germination. I always use a clear plastic to wrap round the compost. Some people might not like the idea. But this way the environment is clean and after seeing some seedlings, I will remove the plastic.

Some very fine seeds don't need to be buried. for example, stretptocarpus, so read the instructions as how deep your bury something determine they will flower or not. For example, for snowdrop bulbs, you need to bury it 3 times the height of the bulbs or they will sulk. Too near the surface, they might dry out and die. So read the instructions and do your research or ask Chuck!
 

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