What the???


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Interesting, thought squash was a full sun plant
Florida sun is brutal. Especially during the summer. Even up here in North Carolina I am having trouble already. Another problem I have found is not to let water hit leaves during the heat of the day. It turns the water into little magnifying glasses.
 
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In a large field of squash a grower accepts some loss, since the attack is random and a few plants are sacrificed.
 
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I agree with Durgan - squash vine borer. Lived in Florida for over 30 years and the sun never was an issue with squash.
 
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Other squash seemed to be fine. It's storming out now, so I can't check on them. If this is vine borer, it may be my first and last season for squash. I can't babysit it that much.

Will they bother the cucumbers?
 

Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
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Some things I do to minimize insect damage to squash:
  • Crop rotation…very important. At least three years between locations.
  • Cover crops: Since the insects’ life cycle is largely in the soil, it makes sense to me to discourage them there. I don’t know which specific cover pants are definitively the most effective, so I plant a large variety of cover crops.
  • Clean out old plants and burn/destroy them. Don’t return to the compost pile.
  • Stagger plant. Start a few plants, and then a couple of weeks later some more, and another two weeks later some more. That way you can have continuous production even with insect problems
  • Companion planting. I like to plant a legume next to them as well as some flowering plants around the garden.
Some of these things are mentioned in the referenced articles on this thread. Collectively, these practices keep us in plenty of squash through the spring season…so much we are usually ready for it to die out.

Currently producing meals every other day (notice green beans closely planted):

producing.JPG



Production to start next week:
production pending.JPG



I don't use insecticides...notice some slight chewing on the green beans...and if my countermeasures don't work sufficiently, I let the bugs have a share and keep planting. Works for me!
 
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Nearly complete detestation! That's what I found today. One thanks had a few good leaves left so I let it be. The rest I pulled up and threw into the fire pit. I planted some beans in there place and I'm stubborn enough to plant some now squash in a large bin that had been growing carrots. Will see what happens, but pretty frustrating. I stayed BT and looked for the offending agents, found one. I'm guessing the others have already made their escape and I'll have to contend with them later. For now, cucumbers and pumpkin look unscathed.
IMG_20190512_155541524.jpg
 

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