Weird rose plant growth

Discussion in 'Roses' started by Shahar, Nov 24, 2018.

  1. Shahar

    Shahar

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    Hi all,

    So I got this rose plant growing in a pot. It had some white powdery problem (forgot what it's called) a while back so had to remove all leaves etc. and it's all gone now.

    BUT following that just that branch kept growing and growing, when I pruned it kept growing solo, until eventually the branches are kinda hanging in an arch back down to the floor. See pics.

    Winter is here, so wondering how to prune it. Some new stems are coming out now surprisingly. 15430373906271510525065.jpg 1543037430744996441402.jpg 15430374638131174319959.jpg
     
    Shahar, Nov 24, 2018
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  2. Shahar

    roadrunner

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    I believe that growth is from the plant looking/needing for more sunlight. I have many milkweed plants in my yard and some grew under clumps of passion flower vines, which I cut just down, since they're dying away this time of year and I have about three milkweed plants that basically grew like vines, much like your rose "bush", because they were looking for more sun and now that the support that they had is gone, they just fall to the ground.
     
    roadrunner, Nov 24, 2018
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  3. Shahar

    Sheal

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    Welcome Shahar. :)

    Do you know the name of the rose please? I think you may have bought either a rambler or climber. When a rose is pruned it will put out more shoots and whether you have a climber or rambler it would probably be wise to prune the long shoot back to encourage more growth from the base. Cut it just slightly above a tiny (sometimes red) leaf bud on the stem. Each bud faces a different direction and will produce a new stem and grow on from that angle. May I suggest that you re-pot it into as large a pot as possible. Roses need to spread their roots and are thirsty and hungry plants. If the rose produces more long stems I suggest growing them along your balcony and tying them in for support.
     
    Sheal, Nov 24, 2018
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  4. Shahar

    Shahar

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    Thanks for your replies.

    So yeah step one will move it to the sun. Then about cutting: how far down do I go? Seems like maybe needs to be cut at main long stem below the balcony level (see pics) but I'm scared to cut so much. Especially as just now two or three stems seem to be growing from just above the balcony level.

    No idea on type of rose, local north Indian variety (growing in North India hehe).

    Could I grow a new plant from the cuttings? How would I do that without access to any "rooting formulas"?

    Thanks
     
    Shahar, Nov 25, 2018
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  5. Shahar

    Sheal

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    Roses prefer a minimum of six hours sunshine or more a day but will be happy with half that.

    It's unlikely you will get any new stems growing from the lower bare part so being 'cruel to be kind' I'd cut it back to the same height as the other stems. You won't kill the rose by doing this as they are quite tough and respond well to hard pruning. As the stem grows back cut off the growing point about six inches to one foot below the balcony rail and it should put out further new shoots. Climbers and ramblers are not as easy to prune as shrub roses but with time you will be able to judge where and when to prune.

    Have you seen the rose growing elsewhere? If the stems are long then I would say that confirms a rambler or climber.

    Yes you can take cuttings but they can prove difficult to root. Some people are successful and others not so it's worth a try, you've got nothing to lose. :)

    You don't need rooting formula's as it's quite simple. Cuttings should be about the length and width of a pencil. Cut the bottom straight across just below a bud and plant that in soil with the bud below the surface. Cut the top at a slant just above a bud, this allows any water to run off. They will probably need six months or more to root, but you will be able to see if they have as buds will start to show growth along the stems. Another way (if they look healthy) is to give them a gentle tug around that time, roots will resist the pulling if they are there. Don't forget to water them! :)

    There is another stem in you rose pot that looks dead, I would prune that out back to the base.
     
    Sheal, Nov 25, 2018
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