septoria leaf spot Plhseudomonas syringae pv. control


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see attached white paper on leaf spot control in tomato
Something must have happened in the interim since January 1997. I would have thought commercial growers and seed merchants would have used this technology or at least have something on the market by now.
 
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Something must have happened in the interim since January 1997. I would have thought commercial growers and seed merchants would have used this technology or at least have something on the market by now.
They were growing in a mist for one thing. I have to read these things a couple of times.

Another is that the "'cilllins" are the group of antibiotics that can be defeated by adaptation. And Pseudomonas as a group of 1000 or more are the exact bacteria they are worried about. Highly adaptable. Even in the case of syringae becoming immune to copper.

Also at least 3 Pseudomonas are highly beneficial to plants, fixing nitrogen and even producing an environment that can stop fungi like Fusarium.

That absolutely killed me. It is to do with their production of bio slimes, the leaf spot being caused by toxin that kills cells allowing it to inhabit the tomato via a chemical means.

I noticed in some other paper a test where alkaline conditions wiped them off a test plate. I do not know what pH, but it is interesting, given calcium is a beneficial metal used for growing, especially tomatoes, and is considered a liming effect since the thing hates alkali.
 
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They were growing in a mist for one thing. I have to read these things a couple of times.
For bacterial leaf spot, growing in a mist is the thing to do as BLS thrives in super humid wet conditions. Growing tomatoes in these conditions is not a normal growth habitat. BLS is fairly uncommon with other leaf spot fungal diseases far more common. For the average gardener indistinguishable from Early Blight and Septoria. The only thing in the white paper that made any sense to me was the inoculation of the seeds. The rest of the article would be useless to a commercial grower as he could not get into his tomato field to foliar spray because it would be too wet and muddy unless he were to spray prophylactically while it was still dry. But, why would a commercial grower spend money to do this unless he can forecast the weather? But if the DNA in the seed made the plant less susceptible to BLS that would be a fine thing indeed and perhaps someday of preventing Early Blight and Septoria as well.
 
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I search for weak spots and that pH detail has me right now. Baking soda, sticky protein film barriers and calcium from milk. I can bring actinovate to the leaves. I find a lot of injectable antibiotics in the tree and forest supply chain as well.
 

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