Rosette disease

Discussion in 'Roses' started by doubledelight, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. doubledelight

    doubledelight

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is this rose rosette disease and if so what steps can I take?[​IMG]n I tak[​IMG]e, if any?
     
    doubledelight, Oct 21, 2018
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. doubledelight

    Sheal

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2015
    Messages:
    1,962
    Likes Received:
    1,550
    Location:
    Inverness-Shire, Scotland
    Welcome doubledelight. :)

    I'm pretty certain it's rosette disease and there's nothing you can do to cure it, sorry!

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/rose-rosette-disease.htm

    If you have any other roses I would suggest keeping an eye on those in case it's been passed on. Looking at your picture suggests the bed has been mulched. To help resistance to disease and bugs, roses are best planted in bare soil with good spacing between them.
     
    Sheal, Oct 21, 2018
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. doubledelight

    marlingardener

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Messages:
    2,498
    Likes Received:
    3,423
    Location:
    central Texas
    Oh, I'm so sorry to tell you that that rose is toast. Dig it up, toss it in the garbage (do not compost it!) That is rosette, otherwise known as Witch's Broom. Don't plant another rose in its place.
    Sheal is right--get rid of the mulch (again, toss it in the garbage since it may be harboring the virus).
    As of now, there is not cure for Rosette. As a rose lover, I understand how harsh this advice seems.
     
    marlingardener, Oct 21, 2018
    #3
    Gail_68 and Sheal like this.
  4. doubledelight

    doubledelight

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for your quick reply!
    It may be rrd and if it is I will follow your advice.
    But now after searching the web, I think there is another possibility.....I sprayed roundup on some Bermuda in an adjacent parking area earlier, trying to be very careful about keeping it away from the roses.
    I think that despite that I still got some spray drift onto the roses . Apparently roses are very sensitive to roundup.
    Google images of roundup damage look VERY similar. They are not dead so if that is the case they may recover. Do you think I should cut them back or just leave them alone until early spring?
     
    doubledelight, Oct 22, 2018
    #4
  5. doubledelight

    DirtMechanic

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2017
    Messages:
    1,942
    Likes Received:
    1,765
    Leave them alone. If any plant is under stress there is no need to stress it further.

    If it is rosette, I might have a direction you could look, but I am a rose rookie.

    Many fungi and virus and other pathogens have developed the ability to control the cells of a plant to support their own purpose. This cell control is chemical in nature and I suspect hormonal in practice. Perhaps someone in rose world is working on a hormone therapy. It would not suprise me, given the market for such things. Also, I have read about heat treatments for some diseases of rose, whereby a nursey can guarantee a disease free plant. Black spot (I think) was one and someone in rose land may be working on something similiar for rosette. There is a mortality rate with the treatment though.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
    DirtMechanic, Oct 22, 2018
    #5
  6. doubledelight

    Jester49

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    How do you treat Rosette disease?
     
    Jester49, Oct 22, 2018
    #6
    Gail_68 and DirtMechanic like this.
  7. doubledelight

    DirtMechanic

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2017
    Messages:
    1,942
    Likes Received:
    1,765
    It is a virus and currently not treatable. Thats why I was discussing areas from which some control might be sought, as the usual method of control is to kill the plant and start over.
     
    DirtMechanic, Oct 22, 2018
    #7
    Gail_68 likes this.
  8. doubledelight

    Gail_68 Beauty blooms in the garden as well as the heart.

    Joined:
    Friday
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    West Midlands_UK
    Jester with rosette disease there's totally no cure, so if you have one like it, your best digging it up and either binning it or burn it.
     
    Gail_68, Nov 12, 2018 at 12:07 AM
    #8
    marlingardener likes this.
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.