Narrow border plants

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Hi all,

We have two narrow borders each side of our small garden which are 18ft long each side and 43cm deep. One side recieves morning sun the other afternoon. We are on sand.

I tend to like some evergreen plants and some perennials, I also like hydrangea paniculata types, nepeta, rudbeckia and ferns. I wondered if any of you have some ideas of what we could plant a good way to arrange, I’m not very creative! I would probably have one of each plant I like in a row and it would look a bit odd! Will attach some photos - they look narrower in pics but I have measured accurately, happy for some stuff to hang over.

Many thanks 😊
 

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I would start by looking at things like clematis, honeysuckle or cotoneaster that would grow up the fence and then look for things to go between. Bulbs don't mind narrow, tulips, daffodil, crocus, and hyacinth give a good bit of early colour, then die down allowing other things to take over. Perpetual strawberries might be popular.
 
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Welcome to the forum Sam. Righto - now for the bad news, I don't think a border as narrow as that will enable much artistic license !! You would find it difficult to do any more than plant a row across it. If it were my garden I would either move the timber further, even if it means losing a few inches of that nice new turf, or take out another strip anyway in front. You need to think of height as well. If you get a few roses that climb and a honesuckle for scent or any other climber you can fix to the fence, it will make a nice backing for your other plants. Before you plant anything, you might need to add some organic stuff to the sandy soil so that it benefits your plants. They will dry out very quickly when it stops raining (if it ever does)
Hydrangea, as its name suggests likes plenty of water, but it is happier in shady places, just like ferns.
Perennials are my favourites and once established they tend to look after themselves well. Stagger them - taller ones at the back. When you've got your beds loaded up I suggest using some bark or other mulch on the ground after a good watering. This will keep the ground moist for longer and will slowly break down to add to the soil. It keeps weeds at bay as well.
Have a look at ideas for planting online - it may help.
Have fun, and don't forget the ''after'' pictures will you :)
 
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Thanks for the suggestions, I was thinking passiflora along the fence each side, then combining evergreen fern, hydrangea paniculata (smaller variety like little lime) and nepeta maybe? I do have a couple of euonymus green spire and harlequins I might pop in too
 

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