HOW TO RAISE PH LEVELS IN MY TOMATO CONTAINERS FROM 5 to 6.8


Joined
Jun 4, 2022
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
North Carolina
Country
United States
Checked my 5 gallon containers with tomato plants that are about 3-4’ high now and the ph levels are down to 4.8-5
Need to get it up between 6-6.8
I put about 3 ozs of garden lime in yesterday then checked the ph levels doesn’t seem to be moving any
Any suggestions or recommendations
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
10,147
Reaction score
4,745
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Changing a soils Ph is not a fast process. It can take months or even years. You can change the Ph rapidly but in doing so you are taking a very big chance of either burning your root systems or stopping nutrient uptake. Adding lime is not fast acting and adding too much can be more detrimental than keeping the plants growing in highly acidic soils. Adding lime is the fastest way but it should have been done last year. Soil tests are very important as they will usually tell you how much lime to add.
 
Last edited:

Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
1,033
Reaction score
885
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Yes, lime is the "slow but sure" way I use to increase soil ph. For a "quick" fix you can use baking soda, sodium bicarbonate. Probably have some Arm and Hammer around. In addition, you can give those tomatoes some Epsom salts to help with mineral uptake.

Be careful with more additives since you have already treated with lime.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
5,748
Reaction score
4,544
Location
Birmingham, AL USA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Those are containers. Your method of adding lime is for in ground use. Subtle things like the biodome are missing from containers and purified potting soils. There are immediately available calcium products that have the liming effect. Usually they come in liquid form for use in spraying. Calcium nitrate is a fertilizer with immediately available calcium. You can try stomach acid products that are sodium free, perhaps tums or rolaids? No salt though. Milk of magnesia since magnesium is a liming agent? No salts or unknown components though. Epsom salts has magnesium but sulphate too and I would not be adding sulfphur at this point I would think. There are hydroponic product like "PH up" that use potassium hydroxide and potassium carbonate. Baking soda has sodium so not a good idea. Personally I am a pretty big fan of all things potassium for its "all around*" effects. You could boil a bunch of red cabbage (ph7) and use that water on them. That way there would be a little nuetral material in it. Tap water is usually pretty nuetral already though, but lord knows what they had to put in it to make it safe to drink.



* N-P-K mnuemonic: Up-Down-All Around
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
3,154
Reaction score
1,323
Location
Port William
Showcase(s):
1
Country
United Kingdom
In the meantime, you can help your plants take up nutrients by giving them a watering with neutral, or slightly alkaline mineral water, not an expensive one of course.
We use one with a pH of 7.8 that costs 20c per pint.
Just use it once, one pint per plant.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 3, 2022
Messages
192
Reaction score
69
Location
East TN
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
Hard water out of the tap contains calcium and magnesium carbonates and usually carries a high(er) pH. You can increase the pH of that water by simply aerating it, aquarium bubbler or shaking the water.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top