Heater recommendations for greenhouse during winter months?

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Greetings All! I am new to greenhouses and trying to get some information to help dad.

We put together a 10'W x 20'L greenhouse so dad can keep his plants alive during the winter months. This upcoming winter will be our second winter season and are looking for a more efficient & effective way to heat the greenhouse.

Last winter, we used a small Mr. Buddy heater. It performed ok, but we had to change out the propane tanks several times a week. It didn't seem to move the heat throughout the greenhouse.

What recommendations do would you suggest to heat this size greenhouse? Would it be better to stick with Propane or switch to Electric?

We live in Ohio and dad would like to keep the temperature above freezing.

Thanks!

BCG

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A bit unconventional, I have a very large terracotta flowerpot which I used to stand a candle under after hearing an old lady on the radio saying that was how they stopped the windows freezing in winter. That worked out expensive and so I got a jar with a metal lid and drove a large nail through it (the lid). Then I wrapped a piece cut from a tin can around the nail a couple of times, took it off and forced it through the hole, made a wick out of cotton wool which I pushed through the tube and half filled the jar with paraffin (kerosene?).
It worked very well, the flower pot gets warm to the hand all over. The water vapour produced was a bit much so I made a chimney from a piece of 3/4 inch copper pipe, which fitted the hole in the flower pot beautifully , and exits through a small hole in the roof. The first couple of feet of the copper get warm too, which helps, but stand the flame on one side as water will condense in the top and run back down, putting it out. A small jam jar of paraffin will last several days, so very economical.
 
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You have 3100 cubic feet of air to keep above freezing. A guess at the volume of a cylinder. The air at a certain humidity has an energy level at 33 degrees. The air outside will be lower. You need to replace the loss. Not sure what your numbers are in your winter I would give the materials an U value of .90 like glass. thats barely R1 where 1/U=R value. U is the expression of change from one surface to the other of a material as energy passes through it. Its a percentage.
 
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Greetings All! I am new to greenhouses and trying to get some information to help dad.

We put together a 10'W x 20'L greenhouse so dad can keep his plants alive during the winter months. This upcoming winter will be our second winter season and are looking for a more efficient & effective way to heat the greenhouse.

Last winter, we used a small Mr. Buddy heater. It performed ok, but we had to change out the propane tanks several times a week. It didn't seem to move the heat throughout the greenhouse.

What recommendations do would you suggest to heat this size greenhouse? Would it be better to stick with Propane or switch to Electric?

We live in Ohio and dad would like to keep the temperature above freezing.

Thanks!

BCG

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I know you posted this last year but I am new to the forum and was just reading your post. I came across this YouTube clip the other day which I thought was very inspiring:
Hope you managed to have a warmer greenhouse this winter. I am looking for ideas myself for next winter.
 
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For a 10'W x 20'L greenhouse, there are several heating options to consider. Here are a few recommendations:



  • Electric Space Heater: An electric space heater is a safe and efficient option for heating a small greenhouse. You can choose from different types of electric heaters, including ceramic, oil-filled, or infrared heaters. They are relatively inexpensive to operate and can be controlled using a thermostat.
  • Electric Fan Heater: A fan heater is another electric heating option that can help circulate warm air throughout the greenhouse. It has a fan that blows air over a heating element, distributing heat evenly.
  • Propane Heater: Propane heaters are commonly used in greenhouses and are a good option for heating larger spaces. They can be portable or mounted to the wall, and can be controlled using a thermostat. However, as you experienced, they require propane tanks that need to be refilled regularly.
  • Radiant Heater: A radiant heater uses infrared technology to heat objects in the greenhouse, such as plants and soil. It is a good option for localized heating and can be used in combination with other heating methods.


When choosing a heating option, consider the following factors:

  • Energy efficiency: Choose a heating option that is energy-efficient and will not consume too much power or fuel.
  • Heat output: Make sure the heater is powerful enough to heat the entire greenhouse.
  • Safety: Choose a heater that has safety features such as overheating protection and automatic shut-off.
  • Cost: Consider the upfront cost of the heater and the ongoing cost of fuel or electricity.
  • In terms of whether to stick with propane or switch to electric, both have their advantages and disadvantages. Propane heaters are powerful and can heat large spaces, but require regular refilling of propane tanks. Electric heaters are energy-efficient and easy to control, but may not provide enough heat for larger spaces.


Ultimately, the choice depends on your specific needs and preferences. You may want to consider a combination of heating options, such as an electric space heater and a radiant heater, to achieve the best results.



I hope this helps, and feel free to let me know if you have any other questions!

For more info check out the following resource

The Brainy Gardener is an online gardening resource that provides practical, real-life tips, tutorials, and inspiration for novice and expert gardeners alike.
 
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Recently I have entertained myself learning about 4 inch forced hot air pipes under floors in the vein of radiant flooring hot water pipes that can later be a problem. Fascinating to think about a greenhouse setup like that.
 
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Bill, what did you ever come up with to heat this space?
I'm curious to because I'm thinking on next Winter.

I thinking of getting a Greenhouse Electric Heater with fan and Thermostat. Plus I'll have two Fans circulating the air.

I have many Tropical Plants and Vegetables and some Flowers.

Oh I have Grow Lights to help with extra Lighting.

big rockpile
 
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I'm curious to because I'm thinking on next Winter.

I thinking of getting a Greenhouse Electric Heater with fan and Thermostat. Plus I'll have two Fans circulating the air.

I have many Tropical Plants and Vegetables and some Flowers.

Oh I have Grow Lights to help with extra Lighting.

big rockpile
I saw a fellow put a bunch of candles in a cheap metal woodstove and call it good for a greenhouse .
 
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Got the Heater just have to get my wife to wire 220.

But figure put the Heater half way up on one side. Put it on the floor I think it will heat better. It will blow and I have two fans up high to circulate the air.
big rockpile
 
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Uhh, 220 ? Are you being serious or joking ? That is a LOT of power for a greenhouse. Electric bill will go up a good bit too. I guess you are planning on keeping it very warm in the super cold where you are then. In the South...we might be able to get away with radiant heat from water barrels and candles under terra cotta pots. Good luck my friend. :)
 
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Uhh, 220 ? Are you being serious or joking ? That is a LOT of power for a greenhouse. Electric bill will go up a good bit too. I guess you are planning on keeping it very warm in the super cold where you are then. In the South...we might be able to get away with radiant heat from water barrels and candles under terra cotta pots. Good luck my friend. :)
Cheaper actually. 110 is the higher resistance. Depends on the mass heated for cost.

I have a small metal wood stove I want to try long burning candles in this winter. Should be interesting and if it really snaps cold for a week I have free wood.
 
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I totally understand and agree if I were to go with that much "power" heat...then (1) 220 heater is less electricity than (2) 110 (usually). I just dont think I would want to pay that much for the electric bill for a few veggies. Of course we do not live in those COLD COLD states either so I can only speak for me. I do wish you success with the heating of the GH rockpile !! You can share photos of the snow outside and the toasty warm inside the GH later...I look forward to those. :)
 

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