Have you grown spaghetti squash?


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We all love spaghetti squash here, but I have never grown it before. I know they call it a winter squash, but yet it doesn't grow in the winter. From what I have been told I should plant it soon, but not sure if I should start it inside or just put the seeds out in the garden.

Have you ever tried to grow spaghetti squash? If so, when do you plant it and does it take over your garden? I am hoping to try it this year but do not know the first thing about growing it!
 
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zigs

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I've grown it a few years back, start the seeds off indoors, but not just yet, as they can't go out until the last frosts have gone.

They are as easy to grow as Corgettes. They do scramble, I grew them up a wigwam to save space, but one tendrill made an escape bid & went over the fence & up next doors Fir tree. Looked like a Christmas tree with the fruits hanging off it:D
 
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I've grown it a few years back, start the seeds off indoors, but not just yet, as they can't go out until the last frosts have gone.

They are as easy to grow as Corgettes. They do scramble, I grew them up a wigwam to save space, but one tendrill made an escape bid & went over the fence & up next doors Fir tree. Looked like a Christmas tree with the fruits hanging off it:D
We have a small yard with a small garden area now. I wonder if maybe I should not plant any if they take over! Unless if I put netting over the back part of our fence and let them grow along the netting over the yard. But not sure if they would get too heavy to do that.
 

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You can use Orange nets to support the fruit, like they do in Greenhouses with Melons, they'd be better off off the ground as they sometimes rot underneath.
 
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I was curious about why they would be called 'winter squash' then (which I'd never heard before) and this is what I found:


The late-growing, less symmetrical, odd-shaped, rough or warty kinds, small to medium in size, but with long-keeping qualities and hard rinds, are usually called winter squash. They belong, almost without exception, to the species Cucurbita maxima or C. moschata.

The small, quick-growing forms that are eaten before the rinds and seeds begin to harden are called summer squash and belong to the species C. pepo.


So it sounds like it might be partially because they grow late in the season and can last into the winter time. I know I've been able to keep spaghetti squash on the counter for a couple months without it going bad.
 
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I was curious about why they would be called 'winter squash' then (which I'd never heard before) and this is what I found:




So it sounds like it might be partially because they grow late in the season and can last into the winter time. I know I've been able to keep spaghetti squash on the counter for a couple months without it going bad.
Mystery solved! Yeah I thought maybe they were supposed to be more of a fall plant or something until I found out they like to grow in the warm weather. Every time I googled recipes it always came up as being a winter squash. I notice they don't go bad quickly too, which is a good thing! I am sure it could probably be stored in the freezer once cooked too, but I am not sure. If I grow them this year I will find out!
Only 3 out of 4 of us like it so I may not go through it too fast if the plants produce a lot. Or I will pay the town $6 to get a permit to sell them with the kids. It can be money for them!
 
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Yep, you can freeze it after it's cooked!

You can also use the seeds similar to pumpkin seeds and roast them. They're quite yummy and last a while, too, so long as you roast them to completely dry and then keep them sealed.
 
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I haven't heard about spaghetti squash before, it's such a strange vegetable, I had to google it to see how it looks like, here is a picture I found:

baked-spaghetti-squash-garlic-butter-4574.jpg


It really looks like spaghetti. How does it taste like?:)
 

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Not bad, nice with salt & pepper:) And thats coming from someone who doesn't really like squashes that much.

Love growing squashes of any sort though.

009-16.jpg


(Milk bottle for scale)

007.jpg
 
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Wow, they're enormous:D . They're such beautiful squashes, I'm jealous, mine were never this big. Zigs, you definitely have a green thumb:D
 
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It doesn't taste like spaghetti. If you add sauce and whatnot like you would with pasta, then it'll have a similar taste because the squash itself and pasta itself don't tend to taste like much of anything on their own. The texture is different, though. It's definitely more like squash than a lovely carb. It's good, though.
 
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Wow, they're enormous:D . They're such beautiful squashes, I'm jealous, mine were never this big. Zigs, you definitely have a green thumb:D

They do alright in a good summer here, but last year was a squash disaster, only had one Corgette & that shrivelled away & died. They suffer from mildew when its damp.
 
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They do alright in a good summer here, but last year was a squash disaster, only had one Corgette & that shrivelled away & died. They suffer from mildew when its damp.

Last year was a disaster for all of my plants except onions and garlic. Think it was the weather or something because usually veggies do quite well here in NJ!
I haven't heard about spaghetti squash before, it's such a strange vegetable, I had to google it to see how it looks like, here is a picture I found:



It really looks like spaghetti. How does it taste like?:)
Yeah that is exactly what it looks like when you cook it. It goes well with many things, but tastes nothing like pasta. It has more flavor and I think it is a little sweet in comparison to pasta. The texture is much different too as Jessi pointed out.

I love it here and have used it in combination with other veggies and I have also used it with spaghetti sauce.
 
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I really love spaghetti squash, and it is really not likely to take over, unless you plant a huge amount of it. It is meant to be stored and eaten during winter, rather than just taken right in and cooked, like say, zucchini ,which is a summer squash. Both are grown in the summer, but winter squash stores well, and summer squash does not keep. Since it breaks up into strings when scraped with a fork after cooking, it is named Spaghetti squash. I do like it with spaghetti sauce on it, but it is also delicious just put on a plate and buttered, like any squash.
 
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Jessi, Dconklin, thank you for your answers - I'm a little bit dissapointed if it doesn't taste like pasta. I was looking for a nice replacement for my spaghetti. To be honest, I'm not a big fan of the taste of squash. Growing it is fun, eating it - not so much:p
 
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I actually think that spaghetti squash has much more flavor than pasta does, but I know that is totally a matter of taste. I would suggest you buy one at the grocery store, bake it, and scrape it out with a fork lengthwise, and then you will have a nice plate of "spaghetti"to test out with your preferred pasta sauce, and then you will know if you like it and want to grow it, or not.
I like it with tomato sauce, or a cheese sauce like you would put on Mac and cheese, and I bet it would be yummy with an Alfredo sauce, as well.
 
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Jessi, Dconklin, thank you for your answers - I'm a little bit dissapointed if it doesn't taste like pasta. I was looking for a nice replacement for my spaghetti. To be honest, I'm not a big fan of the taste of squash. Growing it is fun, eating it - not so much:p

Yeah, I was slightly disappointed, too. I mean, I didn't expect it to taste *exactly* like pasta, but the first time I tried it, it was because I kept hearing people talk about it being a great, healthy alternative.

I will tell you that my girls LOVED it, though. As in, enough so that they started requesting "that spaghetti thing that isn't really spaghetti" (the squash) instead of real spaghetti at times. You can't actually taste the squash once you add sauce, so you may like it anyway.
 
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I think I'll look for it, buy it and try it then. And I'll let you know what is my opinion on "that spaghetti thing that isn't really spaghetti", lol:D
Happyflowerlady, I think I'll add cheese sauce, everything tastes better with cheese:)
 
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I really love it.

It has tons of flavor, and does taste like a squash. I cut mine in half, and about that, don't get one so big you can't cut it in half yourself. I got one home once and had to laugh at myself, saying, Ruth, do you have a chainsaw? A knife would be kind of hard to get thru here lol. I take out the seeds, and put each half on a baking sheet and roast for about an hour.

Roasting time does depend upon the size, smaller ones are ready in about 30 to 40 minutes, but basically most are an hour. You can put some kind of butter or oil on them, and I know some do, but since it's cooking inverted, I don't really like to do that.

After fork tender done, let cool right side up and then just scoop out. Scooping out with a fork is what rakes out the squash like spagetti. A spoon doesn't really do that.

I actually just salt and pepper it. I have used spaghetti sauce, but it just gobs up funny, and bogs down the flavor, and is kinda yucky I think with it. So I just don't that anymore.

I use any herb I happen to have around and what I want the taste of. But mostly, just salt and pepper and butter. Then it has flavor if I don't cover it up.
 
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I never ever planted Spaghetti Squash, but this year I planted one plant just to see how it would do. The vine is taking over our garden. On the bright side, we have several squash on it. My mother actually got me hooked on spaghetti squash. She baked it in the oven and melted butter in the center and then pull the strings loose and mix with the butter, salt, and pepper. Very good vegetable.
 

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