10 July 2021 Romaine Lettuce Processing.

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10 July 2021 Romaine Lettuce Processing.
Posted on July 10, 2021 by Durgan
https://durgan.org/2021/July 2021/10 July 2021 Romaine Lettuce/HTML/ 10 July 2021 Romaine Lettuce
Ten pounds of Romaine lettuce was made into ten liter jars of pressure canned slurry/juice at 15 PSI for 15 minutes for long term storage. The hearts of the plants were set aside for table use. Process was wash and check all leaves, place in cooking pot with ten liters of water. Cook until soft and beat into a slurry with the hand blender. The material was strained through a 2mm mesh to make juice. The residue was put though the Champion Juicer to extract most nutrients .Mixed together then pressure canned. First processing for this year 2021. Pictures depict the process.
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Well, most things I would try to preserve one way or another, but there are some things I would grow less of at a time in order to use them as they grow - fresh. When lettuce is out of season, I would eat something else instead. It's just a matter of choice :)
 
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Preserving at home is a major issue. My slurry/juice method is safe and reasonably quick.

Seed has started but still acceptable.


One cup (about 47 grams) of romaine lettuce nutrition contains approximately:

  • 8 calories
  • 1.5 grams carbohydrates
  • 0.6 grams protein
  • 0.1 grams fat
  • 1 gram fiber
  • 4,094 international units vitamin A (82 percent DV)
  • 48.2 micrograms vitamin K (60 percent DV)
  • 11.3 milligrams vitamin C (19 percent DV)
  • 63.9 micrograms folate (16 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligras manganese (4 percent DV)
  • 0.5 milligrams iron (3 percent DV)
  • 116 milligrams potassium (3 percent DV)
 
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So let us pursue. In my climate there are four months of growing. Reminder of time nothing of significance. Preserving is about the only choice for any variety.

Preserving and keeping nutrients takes effort and practice. Most people have not even attempted preserving for off season use, They have gone the supermarket and fast food route. Without a doubt fresh is best, but climate limits the window of use.

I preserve, tomatoes, cucumbers, green beans, eggplant, beets carrots, lettuce, kale, potatoes, onions, garlic, corn, currants, peaches, grapes, and others as the opportunity presents. Usually around 400 liter jars each year. I grow much of my food in about 2000 square feet in Zone 5.

Growing is important but preserving is usully neglected.
 
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Durgan, I'm about to start picking broad beans (fava/faba), which are hardy enough that some varieties can be direct-sown in late autumn to over-winter without protection, or, as I did, sow them indoors in mid-March to pick now (3 weeks later).

Given their nutritional value, & their profusion, it is something of a mystery to me why you don't grow them.

I will get 50 portions from 22 plants (24 seeds sown), in an area 3ft by 10ft, which is 1 portion per week for me, since my wife dislikes them.
 
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I grow green bush beans and can them. My canning has just started. Thanks for the heads up. I will grow a row next year of Fava beans. Winter is usually too harsh to have plants over winter. I only over winter garlic.
 
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Well, most things I would try to preserve one way or another, but there are some things I would grow less of at a time in order to use them as they grow - fresh. When lettuce is out of season, I would eat something else instead. It's just a matter of choice :)
Umami is a thing! Every time I have cooked lettuce I grow my appreciation for spinach.
 
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I grow green bush beans and can them. My canning has just started. Thanks for the heads up. I will grow a row next year of Fava beans. Winter is usually too harsh to have plants over winter. I only over winter garlic.
I didn't think you'd be able to overwinter them, but I thought that their frost hardiness would make them viable in your short season.
 
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Well @DirtMechanic I had no idea what umami is/was/could be so I looked it up :geek:

Umami, which is also known as monosodium glutamate is one of the core fifth tastes including sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. Umami means “essence of deliciousness” in Japanese, and its taste is often described as the meaty, savory deliciousness that deepens flavor.

Not much of that in lettuce is there :D
 

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