Topsy Turvy Tomato planter?


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I am new to using one of these things, and I was wondering if anyone else has used one of these things and was successful, or unsuccessful? I honestly can't see it working. See how the poor upside-down plant is trying to turn back upwards? The plants are obviously smarter than the person who invented this thing. Plants know to grow UP, not downwards. But I was wondering if anybody else tried one of these odd contraptions?
 

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We used them years ago when they first came out. Had no luck with tomatoes but zucchini and cucumbers did fantastic.
 
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How in the world could you grow a big zucchini plant in there? A cucumber maybe, if it turn upwards and grew up a post or a nearby something. Growing plants upside-down is strange beyond all reason.
 
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No personal experience, but friends of ours had two on their back porch. They ended up with two dead tomato plants and a big mess on the porch. It seems those bags aren't as sturdy as they should be.
 
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Goodness, gracious. The tomato plant I put in there is still quite small...think I'll see if I can't get it out of there! I'd like to whop the Topsy Turvy planter inventor. They obviously know nothing about plants.
 
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We had a trellis on our deck and hung 4 of these. They require a lot of fertilizer and almost constant watering but clues and zucs did well. Containers did not make it to year 2.
 
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I think I'll just get my poor plant outta there and plant it upright.... the way it should be.
 
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Yep! Never trust everything you see and say, "Wow, neat!". Wal-Mart is full of that stuff, and frankly I don't mind telling people... I hate Wal-Mart. :wtf: I have a couple more of those Topsy Turvy things, I bought them for only a dollar each, but I don't think they were even worth that. I'll send them to Goodwill. :LOL:
 
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I successfully grew a 4-stem espalier gardener's delight tomato plant upside down and it successfully grew and ripened 23 trusses of fruit, which is a huge haul for a home gardener in the UK.
The supporting frame was of bamboo, three upright 6ft canes, one in the middle, one each 6 ft either side, 6x 8ft laterals, tied together in two layers, 2ft apart, at 2ft 6" and 4ft 6", with a width either side of ~ 12 ft.
I made the contraption myself from a 20 litre chicken manure bucket, with a number of small holes in the bottom and sides, for root breathing and drainage, and a 38mm (1.5") hole for the plant stem, hung on a hanging basket bracket, so there were no issues of breakage.
The plants obviously do try to turn to reach for the Sun, I would have though that obvious, but were trained on the espalier frame.
Gardener's Delight is an heirloom tomato, slightly bigger than cherry, nearly golf-ball size.

There are obvious benefits to this method:
1) Escape soil diseases and pests, like alternaria, fusarium, verticillium, slugs, nematodes etc.
2) Flowers or other crops, like lettuce can be grown on top.
3) Drainage is slower than in "right-way-up" buckets.

The main disadvantages are:
1)They are still a lot of work, they may drain slower than other buckets, but they still drain far more quickly than the ground, and need a lot of tying in.
2) They get heavy and are difficult to move out of adverse weather.
3) You can't grow big tomatoes without some kind of frame, as it's difficult to support heavy trusses, which have the potential to break the vine.

One other major difference is, if you over-water, then instead of killing the roots, you'll rot the stem, as it drains, which is what may have happened to Mrsclem's tomatoes, as she wrote "They require a lot of fertilizer and almost constant watering"

 
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Would love to see a picture of that set up, sounds interesting! We had our Topsys hanging on our deck. Got full sun, all day! We used a soil blend that had a lot of peat moss and so it dried out quickly. Definitely not overwatered as any extra water drains out.
 
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Would love to see a picture of that set up, sounds interesting! We had our Topsys hanging on our deck. Got full sun, all day! We used a soil blend that had a lot of peat moss and so it dried out quickly. Definitely not overwatered as any extra water drains out.
Peat moss holds lots of water.
It is far more difficult to gauge the moistness of the soil with upside-down planters, and it is the water that drains out which rots the stem near the roots.
 

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