Wicked wisteria


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Henley on Klip, South Africa
Although they are extremely beautiful, Wisteria invades and suffocates everything that grows around it.

The people that owned our home before we moved in, had this big Wisteria, but they just let it go. Now it is invading and slowly killing off my garden.

We have cut it down to the ground with a chain saw, and removed all the vines from the surrounding trees, we even tried poison, but come next season, the bugger just pushes new vines, and the slow torture starts all over again. I have lost halves of some trees and the fences were damaged so badly we had to replace them.

A newspaper article would have read,"Plant kills razor wire fence."

Any ideas on how to stop this menace from destroying my garden?

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Joined
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Henley on Klip, South Africa
Doc, it does not mean that you have to reject it. If you plant it away from other plants, and manage it. It could really be beautiful. it just takes some work and the right spot, and it would be magic.

As I said in my tread post, this one was let go to have its own way, I had to remove a flowering prune it suffocated and half of a Lukwart tree. Removing half of the Lukwart did it more good than bad and it really is beautiful now.

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With the correct placement and care the Wisteria could really be beautiful.
 
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Rather than completely removing an established Wisteria that has become too large, just cut it back hard every year after it flowers in Spring. Perhaps even down to just a couple feet tall. This will maintian it to a manageable size but it will still grow back enough to give some beautiful, fragrant flowers next year... and the chopped Wisteria leaves and stems will make great compost or mulch for your garden.

Lukwart tree seems to be an alternate spelling for Loquat tree (Rhaphiolepis bibas, formerly Eriobotrya japonica), a popular evergreen fruit tree in the Rose Family (Rosaceae) native to southern China. Notice that recently the Loquats were taxonomically moved into the same genus as Indian Hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis).
 

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