What's wrong with this cucumber plant?


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Can anybody tell me what is wrong with this cucumber plant? Leaves have a lot of white in them, some have turned yellow (I removed those). I've read about "powdery mildew" but this is not powdery in the least. It's just in the color of the leaf.

The second pic is of another cucumber plant, although a different variety, seems to be doing quite well and was planted at the same time, in the same "soil" ... 2/3 potting MIX (not soil), 1/3 peat moss, 3/4 cup dolomite lime and 2 cups composted cow manure.

We've been having a LOT of rain here in NYC so I haven't actually watered either of them in at least a couple of weeks. Soil is consistently moist.

Anybody?

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It's mildew. Whether downy or powdery Can't tell from the pictures.
 
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Thank you both for your replies. My next question would be: What can be done to cure it. Any home "remedies" and commercial products seem to be aimed at prevention. What can be done when the plant already has it?
 
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Thank you both for your replies. My next question would be: What can be done to cure it. Any home "remedies" and commercial products seem to be aimed at prevention. What can be done when the plant already has it?
If I were you I would spray with Neem Oil. I have never had anything else work. I would spray 3 times 3 days apart with 1 oz per gallon. Your plant are seriously infected so I can't guarantee it will work.
 
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If I were you I would spray with Neem Oil. I have never had anything else work. I would spray 3 times 3 days apart with 1 oz per gallon. Your plant are seriously infected so I can't guarantee it will work.
Hmmm ... think I'd be better off just getting a new plant?

Appreciate your input. Thanks.
 
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Spray both sides of leaves with 1 part milk to 5 parts water, helps with powdery mildew, as the spores don't like alkaline environment.
Won't help infected leaves, but will help new leaves.
Use once a fortnight.
I use a cheap mineral water with a pH above 7.
 
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The fungus is in the area. It is easy to fight off. A new plant would get it also in the same environment.
Yes, of course ... but knowing that now I would use something to prevent it.

It is rather curious, though, that the plant right next to it doesn't have it. Go figure.
 
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Spray both sides of leaves with 1 part milk to 5 parts water, helps with powdery mildew, as the spores don't like alkaline environment.
Won't help infected leaves, but will help new leaves.
Use once a fortnight.
I use a cheap mineral water with a pH above 7.
Thanks for the suggestion.
 
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Yes, of course ... but knowing that now I would use something to prevent it.

It is rather curious, though, that the plant right next to it doesn't have it. Go figure.
I also noticed that when something gets started in my patch it does not hit everything at once, rather starts in one or a few places and spreads from that point. Here is a link to an article about a wine grape grower running 67 acres with the milk treatment. Powdered milk or whey, on a sunny day, toxic free radicals, waxy layers etc, the article has some interesting details. I have used oils, aspirin, baking soda, and antifungals. I learned that both acidic and alkaline substances impact PM.

Usually, because I am fighting early blight on tomatoes, I am spraying something that takes out the powdery mildew anyway. On my cucumber, the arrival of PM is also a signal that insect season is well under way. Bacterial wilt is far more damaging to my curcubits than PM. If you are going to the trouble of spraying, I would include spinosad and bT while you are spraying something as mild as milk.

I like the milk idea because of the calcium as well. I have learned calcium is really helpful with fast growing veggies and vines. Here, because of a 5pH clay soil, calcium fights the acidity, though I would need to drown the garden in milk spray with a 10% solution.
 
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Turns out this is actually a zucchini (or some squash) plant ... not cucumber at all! Can't tell from the pic, but it's about 2 inches. Thank you all again for the replies.
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Across the pond they call it a courgette. I believe I spelled that correctly. That sounds much more racy than a zucchini to me. And then there is the nonsensical name cucurbit. I swear nerds should given money rather than naming rights. It would be easier on the noggin!
 

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