What's looking good in March 2017


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MaryMary

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What a strange winter we are having here in OH. :confused:

I can't really say they are "looking good" yet, but maybe "looking off to a good start!!" :)


0302171145a.jpg


Fingers crossed, and it doesn't get too cold again, I might have a flower to show you by the end of the month! :)

Thank you for showing me pretty flowers!! (y)
 
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MaryMary that is a Salvia Greggii, also known as Autumn Sage or Cherry Sage. It's a Texas native, perennial, and tough as nails! It also comes in raspberry, white, dark red, and salmon pink colors. It would most likely do well in your area if planted where it would have some winter protection (like against a stone wall or house foundation.) Bees and hummingbirds love it, and it blooms over a long period of time--February to October here.
 

MaryMary

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The daffodil looks the same as it did a week ago. Now, I also have a very tiny tulip. :)

0309171201Tulip.jpg




Salvia Greggii, also known as Autumn Sage or Cherry Sage. It's a Texas native, perennial, and tough as nails! It also comes in raspberry, white, dark red, and salmon pink colors. It would most likely do well in your area if planted where it would have some winter protection (like against a stone wall or house foundation.)
Ok, thank you @marlingardener!! I'll look for it! (y)
 
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MaryMary, if you find a salvia greggii that you like, buy only one. They propagate easily from cuttings--I just take about a 6" to 8" cutting of new wood, stick it in the soil and keep the soil damp, and in about 3-4 weeks, it's rooted and putting out new growth. If you want, you can put the cutting in a pot and when it is growing well, plant it in the soil. These are NOT pot plants!
 
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