Whats looking good in August 2015


Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 29, 2015
Messages
163
Reaction score
27
Country
Kenya
Whenever the weather is good then everything must grow. We had a lot of rain as from July. Now my flowers have grown big. I also have vegetables for August and probably September. What I do not have are fruit trees, which means that I will have to buy.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
2,001
Reaction score
1,908
Location
Emerald Victoria
Hardiness Zone
10a
Country
Australia
With such a wet spring and summer this year a lot of my plants (mainly annuals) have failed but here are the bright spots of my garden. :)

View attachment 8177

Cistus
View attachment 8178

Lavatera
View attachment 8179

View attachment 8180

Nicotiana
View attachment 8181

Double Antirrhinum
View attachment 8182

Knautia Macedonica
View attachment 8183
Lovely bright spots Sheal. Do the snails eat your nicotiana. I have one in a pot and have no been unsure of where to plant it. Very pretty.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
2,001
Reaction score
1,908
Location
Emerald Victoria
Hardiness Zone
10a
Country
Australia
Thank you DeborahJane and Becky. :)

The snails haven't touched the Nicotiana @DeborahJane but they have demolished the flowers on my new Clematis below! :mad: I would imagine they're not lovers of nicotine. :D

View attachment 8199
That's a shame Sheal. Is this the before snails photo as the clematis looks lovely.
I've been told that snails do like nicotiana so I guess I'll have to bite the bullet and find out for myself. So far it's in a small pot on the top shelf of my shelves where plants wait to be planted.
image.jpg
Mind you snails do climb so I'm sure they would have got to it if they'd wanted.
It is pretty and not being displayed at its best so I must decide the best spot. As you can see.....wasted in the "waiting room". I have a large pot with a French Lace hydrangea in it. It's all cut back and looking pretty awful. I'd planted ferns with it in the hope it would give a display while the hydie is bare but it's not really working. I thought maybe the nicotiana might work. I also wondered if hellebores might work. I have some tall growing ones which could maybe interweave amongst the bare hydrangea stalks. Has any one tried something like this. I don't want to kill the hydrangea, it has black stalks and is quite stunning with bright pink heads.
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2015
Messages
2,506
Reaction score
2,076
Location
Beauly, Inverness-Shire, Scotland
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United Kingdom
I've just remembered you're in Australia DeborahJane. :rolleyes: You must have better temperatures there during the winter months than here in Britain as Nicotiana wouldn't stand a chance of surviving. We've had a lot of rain this spring and summer, in fact it's pouring down again now. If the slugs and snails are out and about then it's not my Nicotiana they're after. In fact, they haven't touched anything else in the garden apart from the Clematis. Perhaps they've decided there's better food somewhere else......if I'm lucky! :D

I don't think the Nicotiana will work in the same pot as the Hydrangea, the Hydrangea's roots will sap everything from the soil and Nicotiana droops very quickly if it's not kept watered.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
2,001
Reaction score
1,908
Location
Emerald Victoria
Hardiness Zone
10a
Country
Australia
I've just remembered you're in Australia DeborahJane. :rolleyes: You must have better temperatures there during the winter months than here in Britain as Nicotiana wouldn't stand a chance of surviving. We've had a lot of rain this spring and summer, in fact it's pouring down again now. If the slugs and snails are out and about then it's not my Nicotiana they're after. In fact, they haven't touched anything else in the garden apart from the Clematis. Perhaps they've decided there's better food somewhere else......if I'm lucky! :D

I don't think the Nicotiana will work in the same pot as the Hydrangea, the Hydrangea's roots will sap everything from the soil and Nicotiana droops very quickly if it's not kept watered.
Thanks Sheal. I think I might move the hydrangea out of the pot once it has bloomed this year. It has nice big buds now but really the pot is a central feature and looks pretty ordinary cut back. Not sure what to put there. Originally I had a standard fuchsia which was lovely but broke in the wind. It is a fairly shaded spot. Maybe a pretty lacey type fern. I have just been given one by a friend for my birthday. It will take a while to grow so maybe some annuals to tide me over whilst I'm waiting!!!;) Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 
Joined
May 1, 2014
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
276
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you DeborahJane and Becky. :)

The snails haven't touched the Nicotiana @DeborahJane but they have demolished the flowers on my new Clematis below! :mad: I would imagine they're not lovers of nicotine. :D

View attachment 8199
Those are beautiful flowers. We have had an unusually dry summer and so everything is starting to die around here. The leaves on the trees are already staring to brown because of lack of water. My dad predicts that we are going to have a bad winter this year.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 14, 2015
Messages
2,506
Reaction score
2,076
Location
Beauly, Inverness-Shire, Scotland
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United Kingdom
I think I would put the Hydrangea in the ground too @DeborahJane, don't think they care to much for root restriction.

An idea below and I'm wondering if it's available to you. This is Fuschia 'Hawkshead'. It has delicate white flowers and is hardy so although deciduous it will survive the winter months. This picture was taken last year and over the winter I made the mistake of pruning it. I've found out since 'Hawkshead' doesn't like being pruned and this summer it's hardly flowered at all! :oops: The other little flowers in the pot are dwarf Sweet Peas.


013.JPG
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Messages
2,001
Reaction score
1,908
Location
Emerald Victoria
Hardiness Zone
10a
Country
Australia
I think I would put the Hydrangea in the ground too @DeborahJane, don't think they care to much for root restriction.

An idea below and I'm wondering if it's available to you. This is Fuschia 'Hawkshead'. It has delicate white flowers and is hardy so although deciduous it will survive the winter months. This picture was taken last year and over the winter I made the mistake of pruning it. I've found out since 'Hawkshead' doesn't like being pruned and this summer it's hardly flowered at all! :oops: The other little flowers in the pot are dwarf Sweet Peas.


View attachment 8239
Thanks Sheal. That is a pretty fuscia. I like your suggestion. The standard fuscia grew well in my pot so I think another fuscia would be a suitable and impressive option.(y)
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top