What to use for raised bed partitions?


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This is my first post on this forum. Glad to be here! We are just outside of San Antonio, TX and are putting in a greenhouse. Because of ground surface issues, we had to put in a pad of compressed road base to build the greenhouse on. We can't plant stuff in road base, of course, so we will make a couple of raised beds inside the greenhouse. These will be 12-15 inches deep, about 18" wide.

The question is, what should we use for the walls to contain these raised bed? Treated wood is an obvious choice, but of course it's treated with all kinds of toxic chemicals - no way we could use that for vegetables.

We need to keep cost down, so fancy masonry is out. Something like cinder block takes up way too much valuable floor space.

Any suggestions? What about galvanized siding?

Many thanks.
 
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This is my first post on this forum. Glad to be here! We are just outside of San Antonio, TX and are putting in a greenhouse. Because of ground surface issues, we had to put in a pad of compressed road base to build the greenhouse on. We can't plant stuff in road base, of course, so we will make a couple of raised beds inside the greenhouse. These will be 12-15 inches deep, about 18" wide.

The question is, what should we use for the walls to contain these raised bed? Treated wood is an obvious choice, but of course it's treated with all kinds of toxic chemicals - no way we could use that for vegetables.

We need to keep cost down, so fancy masonry is out. Something like cinder block takes up way too much valuable floor space.

Any suggestions? What about galvanized siding?

Many thanks.
Galvanized siding will rust out within 5 years and it is flimsy and will bow easily if not really anchored in place. They don't make it like they used to. The cheapest thing is haydite blocks and you can even plant stuff in the holes. Much cheaper than cement blocks and you can anchor it easily but you will lose 16 inches as with cement blocks. About the only time you will be able to use a green house around SA is in the winter unless you air condition it or have both ends open and a big fan. Just think about what 105F temperatures will do in an enclosed greenhouse.
 
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I'm using pressure-treated 2x12s for mine. The controversial chemicals I've read about aren't being used anymore. You can also use them with some kind of lining if that's still an issue for you.
 
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I'm using pressure-treated 2x12s for mine. The controversial chemicals I've read about aren't being used anymore. You can also use them with some kind of lining if that's still an issue for you.
That's what I'm reading now, too. The old arsenic has been replaced with copper, only a very tiny amount of might possibly leach into the plants, and only then if they're right against the wood. Looks like the problem's solved.
 
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We have used horse troughs for raised beds more for outside greenhouse than inside. May be too expensive but they are sturdy, durable and have drainage built in Inside the greenhouse we use large plant pots. Our local nurseries will allow one to dump or pick up pots. Some will charge a buck or two. We have created a couple of levels in our greenhouse by putting 2 X 10's on cinder blocks. Pots are portable enough to fit on shelves and can be moved in and out of greenhouse. You can get multiple size pots and they all have drainage holes.
 
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You can use smartpanel also its a wood product preserved with boric acid. I have had a piece outdoors in the leaves by my shed for about 5 years now and am increasingly impressed by its water fastness. Polymers use for waterproofing showers like redgard can be painted on the inside. Its tough as nails too.
 
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I used regular pine from the hardware store. All 2" boards. That was nearly 7 years ago and it's still going strong. I recon it will be good for another 7 at least the way it's going, so overall it's a cheap and decent looking option. Replacing it after 15 years isn't too bad.
 

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