What to do with sawdust?


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After the roofers finished my garden has been trampled over and there is remaining sawdust still. How is this going to effect my flowers? Will they still grow? How can I remove this sawdust without damaging the flowers that have begun to grow?
I think I'm going to be sick:sick:
 
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After the roofers finished my garden has been trampled over and there is remaining sawdust still. How is this going to effect my flowers? Will they still grow? How can I remove this sawdust without damaging the flowers that have begun to grow?
I think I'm going to be sick:sick:
Sawdust will not hurt your flowers and will decompose quickly. Just wash it off and forget about it
 
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As Chuck said, no harm, no foul. If the pile is a little thick, just rake it out so as not to smother something of importance. When I run my table saw, I have a box under it to collect the saw dust, which then gets dumped ( with the exception of PT wood) into my garden beds.
 

Pat

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I would also think it sawdust would decompose and not be a problem for your garden. Good luck.
 
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I know people that actually put their saw dust in their garden in the place of beauty bark. I think beauty bark is a waste of money because after a couple of good days of rain it looks ugly anyway. At least with sawdust you can mix it into the soil and your plants will get extra nutrients.
 
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If the wood was treated I wouldn't want it in a vegetable garden, but it should hurt flowers.

You can also use a leaf blower to dissipate the sawdust or move to a different location.
 

JBtheExplorer

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Sawdust is no problem. Some put extra sawdust over gardens purposely, though I would guess whether we humans know enough about it or not, if the wood is treated, there are likely negative effects from it, whether we see it or not.
 
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I put sawdust, when I have any, on my compost heaps together with grass clippings, plant prunings, vegetable and fruit peelings, shredded paper and anything organic - apart from meat trimmings and leftovers, which are put out early morning for the local cats, crows and magpies to share. The magpies even take the bones away. (y)

Our compost has been feeding our garden for well over 40 years and it seems to have no deleterious effect. :)
 
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I don't want to be the contrary voice, but excessive saw dust could rob you soil and plants of nitrogen. Not saying you have excess, just want to ensure there is clarity on the big picture.

Do not use uncomposted wood products or sawdust as a soil amendment. It is slow to break down, ties up nitrogen, interferes with seedbed preparation, and interferes with soil and water movement through the soil profile.

From
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07235.html

Colorado State University - Extension
 
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I agree with Greenhorn.

Do not use uncomposted wood or sawdust directly on the garden. As I said in my previous post, I put the sawdust on the compost heaps. I failed to emphasise that it shouldn't go directly onto the garden.

Thank you, Greenhorn, for pointing it out. (y)
 

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