What kind of vine is this?


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It could also be a Passiflora vine. Some of the species have leaves very much like the one in your photo, maybe P. incarnata (below) or maybe another species. Either way, it appears you have a beautiful vine there.
upload_2017-10-3_21-52-46.jpeg
 
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It could also be a Passiflora vine. Some of the species have leaves very much like the one in your photo, maybe P. incarnata (below) or maybe another species. Either way, it appears you have a beautiful vine there.
View attachment 28037
I was thinking the same thing, since the leaf in the OP reminded me of my passion flower plant.
 
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Its looks like a wild morning glory. I have them here. It's has a beautiful blue flower that is somewhat larger than a regular morning glory. Build something for it to climb upon. It really is a gorgeous plant.
Ipomoea purpurea is what the name is. Google Impmoea purpurmea pictures/
 
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Morning glory or passion plant -- could be either. It's probably too late in the season to get blooms. As I understand it, morning glory is an annual in my zone (7b), but a passion plant will be back in the spring. I guess I'll find out then.
 
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Morning glory or passion plant -- could be either. It's probably too late in the season to get blooms. As I understand it, morning glory is an annual in my zone (7b), but a passion plant will be back in the spring. I guess I'll find out then.
This plant comes back every year. When I first saw it about 20 years ago it was on a spot of my property where I don't normally go. It was such a nice flower I decided to dig it up and take it to my wife to see if she could transplant it successfully. When I dug it up I found that it came from a tuber looking thing about the shape and size of a large fat cigar. She planted the thing and now it is huge. It is invasive as it pops up in different and sometimes distant locations but when small it is easy to pull up.
http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-creeper-ipomoea-purpurea-purple-tall-or-common-morning-glory-a-species-102770637.html
 
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I have also grown Ipomoea purpurea. The Passiflora vines grow via corkscrew looking tendrils, but i don't think the Ipomoea vine has tendrils. I don't see tendrils in the photo @jonereb originally submitted which might suggest that it is an Ipomoea p. Take care with this plant and all it's parts especially the seeds. I believe all parts of the plant are toxic. Still it is a lovely vine, but take care if you have grazing pets, and/or young children.
 
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Oh, but wait, i do see corkscrew tendrils in @jonereb 's photo so i am thinking it must be Passiflora. Well i hope you let this vine grow so we can know for certain:) Today, my money is on Passiflora.
 
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Oh, but wait, i do see corkscrew tendrils in @jonereb 's photo so i am thinking it must be Passiflora. Well i hope you let this vine grow so we can know for certain:) Today, my money is on Passiflora.
I just went out and looked at mine. Mine have tendrils but they are not corkscrewed. They are about 6 inches long and straight, no curls at all. It doesn't appear that they serve any purpose as they aren't used for climbing.

All in all I would much rather have the morning glory. It took me 3 years to finally get all of the passion flower vines removed. Talk about invasive! They came up all over the place and just kept coming up. They drove my wife crazy. The only thing I liked about the passion plant was its stunning flowers.
 
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I didn't have any problems with my Passiflora being invasive. I don't know what species you had, but didn't you eat the fruit? It is heavenly (and will cure what ails you). Did your volunteers come up from seed? or runners? I suspect seed. I left no fruit on the ground to grow new plants, but harvested and ate/gave away all the fruits. I cut the ripe ones in half and scoop the pulp (seeds and all) out with a spoon and eat it that way. I had the species "edulis" which may be tastier than other species.
 
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I didn't have any problems with my Passiflora being invasive. I don't know what species you had, but didn't you eat the fruit? It is heavenly (and will cure what ails you). Did your volunteers come up from seed? or runners? I suspect seed. I left no fruit on the ground to grow new plants, but harvested and ate/gave away all the fruits. I cut the ripe ones in half and scoop the pulp (seeds and all) out with a spoon and eat it that way. I had the species "edulis" which may be tastier than other species.
This is all new to me. The plants came up from runners or some underground thing. The fruits, if you can call them that, were damaged by caterpillars. We just let the caterpillars do their thing. I think we are talking about something different. This had a blue flower with orange and red centers.
 
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We are talking about different species of Passiflora, and there are many. The caterpillars you found would have been Zebra Longwings, Gulf Frittilaries, and various Heliconia. We are talking about the same Genus, but a different species. The Passiflora edulis has a flower that looks like this and is wonderfully fragrant.:)
IMG_0986.JPG
 
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UPDATE: I added a small iron arch to the entrance of my stone patio, dug up the vine in question, and planted it so it will grow up the arch. We'll see if it survives the winter -- or the transplant.
 
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UPDATE: I added a small iron arch to the entrance of my stone patio, dug up the vine in question, and planted it so it will grow up the arch. We'll see if it survives the winter -- or the transplant.
Did you find a tuberous or rhizome looking thing when you dug it up?
 
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I didn't examine it closely, and didn't disturb the soil too much for fear of damaging the plant. I did see what appeared to be a root system, but this could have been from another grass or weed -- who knows.
 
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About one week has passed since I transplanted the mystery vine. So far it seems to be doing well in it's new home in spite of cool evenings in mid to upper
VineTransplanted.JPG
-40s.
 
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Looking very good in it's new location. If it was growing wild it will probably not be too fussy about the temps.
 
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